Wimbledon 2019: A Look at the Men’s Singles Favourites

The pinnacle of the tennis season, not least the grass court season, is almost upon us – Wimbledon. The penultimate Grand Slam begins next month at the world-famous All England Lawn Club in SW19 and in readiness for the tournament beginning, we take a look at the favourites to win the men’s singles title. But in the meantime, check out all the latest Wimbledon men’s odds online.

Novak Djokovic

Reigning champion and world number 1, Novak Djokovic is the overwhelming favourite for the men’s singles title again this year. The Serbian has four Wimbledon titles to his name and overcame South African Kevin Anderson in last year’s final, 6-2, 6-2, 7-6(7-3). He previously enjoyed back-to-back wins in Wimbledon finals against Roger Federer in 2014 and 2015.

This season, Djokovic has won the Australian Open, which in turn, saw him win his fifteenth Grand Slam title; and he was also successful at the Madrid Open, beating eighth-seed Stefanos Tsitsipas in straight sets, 6-3, 6-4.

Rodger FedererRoger Federer

He holds both the records for the most Grand Slam titles (20) and the all-time record of eight Wimbledon titles, so there’s little doubting Roger Federer’s ability to go all the way again.

In the Open Era, he shares the record with Björn Borg for winning five consecutive Wimbledon titles. His first came in 2003, while more recently, Federer won his eighth Wimbledon title in 2017, when he defeated Marin Čilić in straight sets, 6-3, 6-1, 6-4.

The former world number 1 is currently number 3 in the ATP rankings, having retired in the quarter-finals of the Italian Open and lost out at the same stage of the Madrid Open in his return to clay after three years out.

Rafael Nadal

He may sit behind Roger Federer with 18 Grand Slam titles to his name, but the King of Clay, Rafael Nadal, has only won Wimbledon twice. The world number 2 first won the tournament in 2008, defeating the Swiss ace in five sets, 6-4, 6-4, 6-7(5-7), 6-7(8-10), 9-7; before winning for the second time in 2010, beating the Czech Republic’s Tomáš Berdych, 6-3, 7-5, 6-4.

This year, Nadal came runner-up in the Australian Open (a Grand Slam he’s only one once, in 2009); while a string of semi-final defeats in a number of ATP 1000 masters finally culminated in victory, when he won the Rome masters last month. More recently he added to his Grand Slam tally, by winning the French Open for the twelfth time.

Alexander Zverev

He’s the second-youngest player in the ATP top 10 and is certainly one to watch for the future, with 10 career titles to his name already. However, 22-year-old Alexander Zverev, has yet to make a lasting impression on the big stage. At Wimbledon, his best finish to date has been making the fourth round (2017).

Last year he made the quarter-finals of the French Open, losing to eventual runner-up Dominic Thiem in straight sets, 6-4, 6-2, 6-1. However, the German has previously overcome the odds and tough opposition. Only last year, he beat Djokovic in the ATP finals, while he previously beat the Serb in 2017’s Italian Open and in the same year, beat his idol, Federer in the Canadian Open.

Does Horse Racing Need To Make Changes To Keep Up With Sports Betting?

A gambler can walk into the Meadowlands Racetrack or Monmouth Park in New Jersey — or at racetracks in other states such as Pennsylvania and West Virginia — and go to the sportsbook there and place bets on sporting events. The “hold” by the books averages around 5%.

Or the gambler can make a wager on a horse race, either happening at that track or elsewhere via a simulcast TV feed. The hold for that bet is around 15-20%.

Is that a problem, now that sports betting increasingly is going hand-in-hand with horse racing?

The Thoroughbred Idea Foundation, a not-for-profit industry advocacy group, said it is, in a provocative report published earlier this year.

“Racing’s existing customers, including our best customers, will be wooed by fabulously funded sports betting agencies,” the article reads, “while future generations of potential customers will be avalanched by customized fixed-odds betting products featuring their favorite leagues, teams, and players. The opportunities will be endless.

“Over roughly the next two to three years, racing must adapt to these new market conditions — accepting fixed-odds and exchange wagering on its product; developing a new funding model to support the sport in light of this disruptive, well-financed and aggressive competition; significantly boosting and improving our marketing efforts; and innovating to create new types of bets for customers who will soon be taken by agile, forward-thinking sports betting outlets. The future of horse racing …

Sports Betting in New York State

Sports bettingThis year, New Yorkers who want to be part of that action [March Madness] legally must still take their money to another state, with New Jersey the closest option. Next year, though, they should be able to place bets in New York, as the last of the state’s consequential bans on betting disappears. And this might be New York’s best chance to get gambling right and correct the mistakes of the past.

Over the decades, a step-by-step loosening of the state’s betting ban allowed lotteries, bingo, off-track betting, Indian casinos and slot-machine “racinos.” Then in 2013, the state constitution was amended to allow seven non-Indian casinos. The four approved for the Southern Tier and upstate have opened. Three more, in New York City and downstate, can be licensed and built starting in a few years. Those 2013 changes also approved on-site sports gambling for casinos, a bonus that didn’t pay off until last year, when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a ban on sports betting in most states.

With Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo …

Would Sports betting hurt or help Washington’s horse-racing industry?

When the U.S. Supreme Court held the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA) unconstitutional in May 2018, it left the decision whether or not to regulate and tax sports betting up to each state.

In Washington state, there are several stakeholders in the debate over potential regulations, ranging from behavioral health advocates to Washington’s tribes. Another eyes the impending, burgeoning industry with what seems to be a complex combination of worry and hope: horse racing.

Doug Moore, the Executive Secretary of the Washington Horse Racing Commission (WHRC), represented the WHRC at the Washington State House Commerce & Gaming Committee work session last week. Moore showed that the horse-racing industry in Washington has experienced a steep decline in recent years as other forms of gambling have been introduced — with the most significant impact hitting after the first tribal casino opened in 1991…

NY and CA are prime examples of why all states don’t have sports betting . . . yet

New York and California are prime examples of why all states don’t have sports betting . . . yet Off Shore Gaming Assocation Hartley examines why just a handful of U.S. states have passed sports betting laws, despite the repeal of PASPA nearly seven months ago.

Source: NY and CA are prime examples of why all states don’t have sports betting . . . yet

How DFS sites FanDuel and DraftKings are taking aim at the world of sports gambling

How daily fantasy sites FanDuel and DraftKings are taking aim at the world of sports gambling

New York Daily News Full coverage: How daily fantasy sites FanDuel and DraftKings are taking aim at the world of sports gambling

Study States that Sports Betting Could Help Sports Attract Younger Fans

Las Vegas sportsbook contestSports-betting adults are more affluent, younger, more diverse and better educated adults than the general population, according to an American Gaming Association (AGA) commissioned study from Nielsen Sports.

The research identifies groundbreaking demographic and behavioral characteristics of self-identified bettors who the AGA believes will populate the future legal U.S. betting landscape. A second, forthcoming element of the project will estimate the amount of revenue this demographic can help unlock for the major U.S. sports leagues….

Find the Full PDF Report from American Gaming Association

Sports betting has “serious consequences” for Pro Players

“As a growing number of the various states move toward adopting legalized gambling, the sports leagues have concerns. The players associations do, too.

There are serious consequences, particularly for the athletes,” NFL Players Association V.P. for business and legal affairs Casey Schwab told David Purdum of ESPN.com. “Because of those consequences, the athlete’s voice must be heard, particularly as we contemplate sports betting in the country.”

The athlete’s voice can be heard, but the entities setting up the wagering programs don’t necessarily have to listen. For years, don’t-call-it-gambling-gambling on fantasy football has existed, with individual player performance residing at the heart of the process. And the athlete’s voice hasn’t been heard…”

Source: NFLPA exec: Sports betting has “serious consequences” for players

Sports Betting May Not Happen Quickly Despite SCOTUS Ruling

Sports bettingDespite the state Legislature paving the way for sports gambling almost five years ago, regulators in New York tasked with implementing a framework for the industry appear to be in a holding pattern following a decision by the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down a limit on the states that can offer sports gambling.

Source: Sports gambling maybe not imminent despite SCOTUS ruling

NJ horse racing group sues major sports leagues over bet losses

The action filed by the New Jersey Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association claims the leagues acted in bad faith when they sought a restraining order in 2014 to block Monmouth Park Racetrack from offering sports betting, because the pro leagues were actively promoting and endorsing businesses that made millions from fantasy sports games that rely on …

Source: NJ horse racing group sues major sports leagues over bet losses