The World’s Most Beautiful Race Courses

World's most beautiful race courses: From beaches to frozen lakesIf the thunder of hooves and the thrill of the racing doesn’t grab you, the sublime settings surely will.

From the grounds of a 16th-century chateau, to beaches, snow-covered lakes, glorious greensward and a track squeezed among skyscrapers, the sport of kings offers some spectacular venues for racegoers to savor.

Here is a look at some of the most beautiful horse racing locations in the world.

Boasting the world’s first five-star trackside hotel, restaurants and a museum,

Spectacular and timeless, Chantilly racecourse nestles in front of the fairytale 16th-century Chateau de Chantilly amid a tree-lined tract 30 miles north of Paris.

is a cathedral to 21st-century racing.

The grandstand alone is more than a mile long and can host 60,000 spectators. What’s more, there is a rooftop infinity pool.

Since it replaced the Nad Al Sheba racecourse in 2010, Meydan has been home to one of the richest horse races in the world — the Grade 1 Dubai World Cup.

Handicapping Tip of the Day #13 – Hometown Handicapping

Handicapping Tip of the Day – November 6, 2015

Handicapping tips from agameofskill.com

When simulcasting wagering really took off in the late 1980s into early ’90s, the game of horse racing betting changed dramatically.  Today, younger horseplayers have no idea what it was like in the past when one had no other choice than to focus on just their home track.  With the exception of major events like the Kentucky Derby, wagering on other tracks was not an option.

King's Swan claimer

Former claimer King Swan, copyright Agameofskill.com

There was a lot to be said for the time when a handicapper could only play his hometown track.  You were forced to know the trainer and jockey colony inside and out.  You even knew the horses by name, what their abilities were and in what type of races they fit.  I would watch the  Harvey Pack show many nights with my father after coming home from school and taking a break from homework.  Oftentimes I could pick the winner just by looking at the entries they would flash on the screen prior to showing the race replay. “Well, King’s Swan should handle that field,” I would state, and all too often that’s exactly what would happen. Good luck doing that today in the age of simulcast wagering.  Many horseplayers are all over the map, trying to conquer tracks from coast to coast.  Consequently, they are not as familiar with the trainers  and jockeys or how the track plays at particular distances and surfaces.

If you’re not getting the results you want, take a step back and look at how many tracks and races you are playing each week.  It might be time to focus on your hometown product.

Missing Our Other Tips of the Days?  Click here

Colonial Downs Dispute Heads to Racing Panel

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) – The Virginia Racing Commission was scheduled to meet with the fate of the state’s only pari-mutual wagering horse track at stake. The commission was set to meet Wednesday in Richmond. It is expected to take up the months-long dispute between Colonial Downs and its horsemen’s association. No racing occurred at the New… [Read more…]

Racetrack Management: Take Care of Your Fans

Who is your team?

Excerpt: “While pondering this, I couldn’t help but think of the difficulty horse racing has faced while trying to maintain and expand its fan base. As an industry, horse racing has been aware for some time that in order to survive it must do this, but that is far easier said than done.

The tricky thing with horse racing is there are no teams to cheer for. Loyalty to a runner rarely can last more than a few years, simply because said horse will be retired. People have favorite trainers and jockeys, but the star of the game has always been the horse.

It’s not like an NFL team that a family will follow for generations, through thick and thin. For instance, my family’s team is the Denver Broncos. While John Elway will always be beloved, our loyalty to the Broncos did not change when he retired. I guarantee that some of the fans Zenyatta picked up along the way retired from racing when she did.

Another unique aspect of the game is the gambling. Getting people in the door simply isn’t enough. The success of a race meet is not only judged by attendance but by handle.

For instance, Lone Star Park ended its spring thoroughbred meeting with a 10 percent increase in average daily attendance, which was the largest average daily attendance increase in the track’s history. But, overall handle was down and that had to be addressed. While pondering this, I couldn’t help but think of the difficulty horse racing has faced while trying to maintain and expand its fan base. As an industry, horse racing has been aware for some time that in order to survive it must do this, but that is far easier said than done.”

 

[READ THE ESPN PIECE] and share your thoughts here on AGameofSkill.com