Thoroughbred Horse breeding in Minnesota is a High-risk, High-reward Business

“They’re all Kentucky Derby contenders,” Rake said, “until you find out they’re not.”

On the seventh day of his vigil, Scott Rake hovered over his laptop and rubbed his bleary eyes. His mare, Peaceful Sky, should have given birth by now — and with her pregnancy at 340 days and counting, he was trying his best not to worry. Rake, his wife, Angie, and farm manager Heather Haagenson began… [Read more…]

Former QB Jake Delhomme now calls shots in horse racing

LAFAYETTE, LA — Growing up it was always school, sports and horses for Jake Delhomme. Now that the other two are out of the way, thoroughbred horses still consume Delhomme’s interest as he plans to enter several from his Set Hut stables during the racing …

Source: Former quarterback Delhomme now calls shots in horse racing

NY Times features story about controversial horse owner

One of the most hated men in the world is a Thoroughbred racehorse owner, and he is not just some “bit” player in the lucrative, worldwide game. He has owned horses in some of the biggest races in the world, including The Melbourne Cup.

Ramzan A. Kadyrov is the leader of the Russian Republic of Chechnya, and he has been accused of numerous atrocities against human kind. As a result, both of his racing applications in Kentucky and New York, arguably the top two racing jurisdictions in the United States, have been rejected.

Check out this except from Wired magazine in 2009:

Opponents and critics of Ramzan Kadyrov — the pro-Kremlin president of the Chechen Republic — have a habit of meeting violent, unexpected ends. Earlier this year [2009], Umar Israilov, a former bodyguard to Kadyrov, was tracked down and killed in Vienna; he had disclosed information on torture and extrajudicial killings in Chechnya.  And most famously, investigative journalist Anna Politkovskaya was murdered outside her home in Moscow in late 2006. She had been researching a story on misdeeds by Kadyrov’s militia; the murder remains unsolved.

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