Winning Trainers at Keeneland – to date

Alpha List of Keeneland FALL 2015 wins

As of the conclusion of racing on October 18, 2015  (13 days of racing)

 

Arnold                         2

Asmussen                    4

Baker                           1

Bennett                       2

Borell                          1

Bradley                        1

Burchell                       1

Calhoun                       1

Casse                           8

Catalano                      4

Colebrook                    2

Cowan                         1

Cox, Brad                    2

Delacour                     1

Dorochenko                 1

Foley, V.                      1

Gorder                         1

Hamilton                     1

Haran                          1

Hartlage                      1

Hartman                      1

Hiles                            1

Hinsley                        1

Howard                       1

Jones, Larry                 2

Kenneally                    3

Kordenbrock                1

Kurtinecz                     1

Lopresti                       1

Lukas                           2

Lynch                           1

Maker                         1

Mason                         1

McGaughey                 1

McLaughlin                 4

McPeek                       6

McKeever                    1

Michael, B                   1

Montano                     1

Moquett                      1

Morse                          3

Motion                        2

Mott                            1

O’Connell                    1

Oliver, V                      1

O’Neill                         1

Peery                           1

Pletcher                       3

Porter                          1

Preciado                      1

Proctor                        1

Richard, Chris             4

Rivelli                          1

Romans                       5

Scherer, M                  1

Schu                             1

Sharp                           4

Stidham                       1

Sullivan                        1

Tomlinson                   2

Vance                          1

Vashchenko                 1

Von Hemel                  1

Ward, Wesley            6

Wilkes                         1

Woodward                  1

Keeneland 2015 fall trainer bookLearn how the “Kings of Keeneland” dominate this meet in Art Parker’s book.

“Off the Charts” Trip Notes – Oct. 8, 2015

BELTERRA PARK

Tally Jax (Belterra Park – 10/4/15 – Race #5 – #9 – One mile on the dirt.) – John McKee in the saddle for Eduardo Caramori who has been every effective on the Ohio circuit. He stalked perfectly, and put together a solid bid. He made some late gain, but the track was a sticky goo that ranged between muddy and gummy. It just didn’t fit his liking, and with a surface with a little more grab. I think we’ll have a trip to the winner’s circle coming soon.

BELMONT PARK

Luminary Flight (Belmont Park – 10/3/15 – Race #1 – #1 – 6 1/2f on the dirt.) – John Velasquez was aboard for an eventful trip as his mount broke in the air and brushed the starting gate doors. After attempting to settle out for a shot at redemption, he entered the far turn three wide and bumped late in the lane.

Red Vine (Belmont Park – 10/3/15 – Race #5 – #5 – one mile on the dirt.) – Joel Rosario teamed up with Christophe Clement. He stumbled at the start and was immediately sandwiched between runner son both sides. After being pin-balled around, he regained composure to put together a top notch run. I think a cleaner trip makes him an appointment for the winner’s circle.

KEENELAND

Judy the Beauty (Keeneland – 10/3/15 – Race #6 – #3 – 6f on the dirt.) – Jockey Mike Smith was in town to ride for Wesley Ward,  and this top shelf gal is always worth the trip. That is, until Saturday. – “Judy” was pocketed up most of the race and the patient Smith waited for the seam to open. She was begging out for room and denied down the lane. Once freed up along the rail it was a little two late as the outer two had momentum and did not allow her time to fire up her jets.  – Give her just half a bad trip and she’ll make em’ pay down the lane.

Exaggerator (Keeneland – 10/3/15 – Race #8 – #7 – 1 1/16 on the dirt.) – Kent Desormeaux aboard for his brother had a eerie feel of last year’s juvenile run. He did everything right for most of the trip and spilt horses down the lane to offer up a razor sharp challenge. He did get a little lost nearing the top of the lane and Kent D. got his mind right back on business and he responded quickly. – Each passing race has him maturing, and I think next trip out will be his coming out party.

Conquest Tiz One (Keeneland – 10/4/15 – Race #7 – #4 – 6f on the dirt.) –  Javier Castellano aboard for Mark Casse who comes loaded for bear this meet. Jumped out to fight for the lead, settled in with solid pace and looked like a player as they turned for home. She did everything right but win. Maybe it was the fractions, the track condition, or just a bad luck turn. But she’ll get more from this race and be much the better next up.

 

Trainers to Know at Keeneland

 Jockey and trainer at Keeneland

Copyright agameofskill.com

by Rich Nilsen

Several years ago Howard Battle, who for four decades served as the Racing Secretary at Keeneland, had this to say about his beloved racetrack: Keeneland should be the national park of racing.  The beauty of spring with the clean, clear air and the blooms of the pears, crab apples and dogwoods are excelled only in October by the yellows, golds, ambers, oranges and reds of the same flora. Besides the aesthetic atmosphere and multitudinous contradictions to most racing establishments — tree-lined parking, one-mile-and-a-sixteenth course, two finish lines, facing the sun, and being near the horses in their natural setting — we are still the best road to the Kentucky Derby (G1) and Kentucky Oaks (G1) and now the Breeders’ Cup in the fall.”

It’s true that few, if any, tracks rival Keeneland in both its beauty or history.  The Lexington, Kentucky track also offers a unique and popular race meet. Handicappers should understand the motivation of the connections (owners and trainers) as well as how the short condition book is written. With few claiming races written, the racing cards cater to the high profile barns that ship in from out of state for the short meet.  The only turf races are allowance events and stakes. To many owners, winning a race at Keeneland is equivalent to capturing multiple events at another track.

Keeneland Trainers

Many of the best barns point for this meeting and have their runners primed to run their best races. There are also many fine local Kentucky trainers, like Phil Sims and Andrew McKeever, who do well during the spring and fall meets, and knowing who they are behooves the horseplayer.  Knowing how they win is even more important.

Regular AGameofSkill.com contributor Art Parker publishes his Keeneland Winning Trainer Patterns book twice a year, and going into this fall meet, he has compiled 24 trainers who he has termed, “The Kings of Keeneland.”  These two dozen trainers have dominated Keeneland over the past several years:

Tom Amoss

George Arnold

Roger Attfield

Chad Brown

Mark Casse

Wayne Catalano

Christophe Clement

Eddie Kenneally

Charles Lopresti

Michael Maker

Shug McGaughey

Andrew McKeever

Kiaran McLaughlin

Kenny McPeek

Graham Motion

Bill Mott

ToddPletcher

William Proctor

Dale Romans

Jonathan Sheppard

Phil Sims

Al Stall, Jr.

Michael Stidham

Wesley Ward

You can discover more about how the Kings of Keeneland win, day in and day out, by tapping into Art’s book, “Keeneland Winning Trainer Patterns – 2015 Fall Meet”

KEENELAND BONUS TIP

Pay Attention Early for a Track Bias
Pay attention to the first couple of races each day at Keeneland to determine if any bias is at play. On many days the track will play fair but, if you can catch a bias early, the rest of your day could prove very lucrative. On a day when the track is favoring speed, you’ll see the early pace horses hanging on well and closers having a difficult time making up any ground.

Look to take advantage of the 1 1/16-mile races. The starting gate for this commonly run Keeneland dirt distance is close to the first turn and the stretch run is short, making it conducive to speed horses breaking from inside posts.  Stretch runners typically do not have time to succeed with their lates run.

Also, keep in mind that when it rains, the track has a tendency to be speed favoring.

Keeneland Winning Trainer Profile: Roger Attfield

Keeneland Green LogoA Trainer Profile from the book Keeneland Winning Trainer Pattern

At age 76 Roger Attfield is doing anything but slowing down. His annual routine takes him to Gulfstream Park, Keeneland and then back home to Woodbine. And he may work in the fall meeting at Keeneland as well. The English born Attfield has received the highest racing honor on both sides of the Canadian-US border. He has been inducted into the racing Hall of Fame in both countries. He has won the Sovereign Award for Outstanding Trainer in Canada a record six times. And a very impressive note in his resume is that Attfield trained three of the seven horses who have won the Canadian Triple Crown.

Scoring with first layoff runners is where Attfield excels the most. Over 62% of his winners at Keeneland have been those returning from a rest. About 18% of his winners are those in their second race after a layoff. Attfield normally works his horses 6-8 days apart with a final prep coming 3-4 days before race day. Over two-thirds of his winners have their final work at Keeneland, no matter from where he is shipping.

A large percentage of Attfield’s runners will show work (including racing) between 12-20 furlongs in the past 30 days. Longshots rarely come with a Roger Attfield entry. Of all his wins in Lexington he has only one runner that went off at more than 10-1. Three owners account for more than half of Attfield’s winners: Charles Fipke, Stella Perdomo and Harlequin Racing. Half of Attfield’s winners were ridden by either John Velazquez, Jose Lezcano or Javier Castellano.

Keeneland Winning Trainer Pattern no longer includes boring stats on a bunch of trainers.  Instead, author Art Parker has taken a hard look into his comprehensive personal database at the trainers that win the majority of races at the meet – the 24 so-called Kings of Keeneland.

Parker’s includes two bonus handicapping articles written by veteran turf writers Tom Amello and Rich Nilsen.

Click here for more information on this one-of-a-kind book that you can download to any device.

FINAL 36 HOURS: Keeneland Trainers Book Being Taken Down

This is it.  Final Chance to download Art Parker’s one of a kind publication to help you win on the Keeneland meet and year round in Kentucky.  We’re taking the book down for sale on Saturday evening.

KEENELAND WINNING TRAINERS

– 2015 SPRING MEET EDITION 

Keeneland_2015 Spring meetWinning Patterns on the trainers that dominate this popular meet!  Bonus Handicapping Articles.  NEW & IMPROVED! Detailed write-ups on the 18 trainers, explaining exactly how they win at this prestigious meet.

Keeneland Winning Trainer Pattern no longer includes boring stats on a bunch of trainers.  Instead, author Art Parker has taken a hard look into his comprehensive personal database at the trainers that win the majority of races at the meet – the 18 so-called Kings of Keeneland.

Parker includes two bonus handicapping articles, explaining how to take notes on winners that are great bet-againsts next time out, and how to use trainer handicapping to your advantage.

 “It’s a wealth of information for horseplayers serious about attacking the Keeneland meets.” – publisher Rich Nilsen

The 2015 Spring Meet Edition of “Keeneland Winning Trainers” is still available for a few more hours from publisher All Star Press.

Enhanced and streamlined book  includes detailed written analysis on the following 18 trainers:

The Kings of Keeneland

Tom Amoss

George “Rusty” Arnold

Mark Casse

Wayne Catalano

Christophe Clement

Eddie Kenneally

Charles Lopresti

Mike Maker

Shug McGaughey

Ken McPeek

Graham Motion

Bill Mott

Todd Pletcher

Tom Proctor

Dale Romans

Al Stall, Jr.

Michael Stidham

Wesley Ward

 

Buy Now – only $9.97, the only book of its kind

You can put this comprehensive trainer guide on any PC or Mobile Device, and then easily look up the Kings of Keeneland when you are ready to handicap or play a race!

 

Trainer Book for Keeneland now Available

Keeneland_2015 Spring meet“Keeneland Winning Trainers – 2015 spring meet edition,” which profiles the most successful horsemen that race in Kentucky, is now available in all e-book formats, including PDF format and for the popular Kindle eReader.  It’s been completely overhauled with a brand new format.

Written by author and handicapper Art Parker, and based on Parker’s personal trainer database, “Keeneland Winning Trainers” evaluates the tendencies of successful horsemen at the prestigious horse racing meet in Lexington, KY.

This new handicapping and horse racing e-book has been released just in time for the upcoming Keeneland spring meet which begins this Friday, April 3rd. The handicapping guide has been completely overhauled and revised to cover the top trainers who dominate this meet year-in and year-out.

“We published this informational book in a user-friendly format that could be read on any eReader, smart phone or Tablet device,” explained Rich Nilsen, President of All Star Press and founder of the educational horse racing site, Agameofskill.com.

“This way, any horse racing fan can have this book’s information right at their fingertips through the mobile device of their choice,” continued Nilsen.  “If you are at Keeneland or your local track/OTB, and you are handicapping the Keeneland races, you can easily look up the winning trainers before the race. You can see how they’ve won in the past, and if the horse they are running today fits a similar profile.”

Author Art Parker analyzed the winning trainers at the Keeneland meets over the past five years to uncover familiar winning patterns. The belief, which is held by many successful horse racing handicappers, is that trainers follow similar patterns when winning.

“Only 18 trainers have accounted for over 40 percent of the winners at Keeneland since 2010,” explained Nilsen. “Knowing how these trainers win is critical to selecting winners every day in Kentucky.”

“Keeneland Winning Trainers – 2015 spring meet edition” is available direct from the publisher through retailers such as Amazon.com for the Kindle eReader and Kindle Fire. It is the only handicapping book specifically about Keeneland that is available to Kindle users.

Keeneland, Red Mile team up on Instant Racing

LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) – Two central Kentucky racetracks are dropping plans for their own Instant Racing parlors and have announced plans to partner in one large facility. The deal involving the thoroughbred Keeneland Race Course and The Red Mile standardbred track announced Wednesday still requires the approval of the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission. The Courier-Journal reported…

Keeneland Opens Friday: 7 Reasons to Focus on this Meet

By Rich Nilsen

Gracing a picturesque stretch of Kentucky bluegrass that is surrounded by some of the country’s most beautiful farms, Keeneland Racecourse is unique in its beauty and history.  Visit Keeneland once and you will quickly see that it is an incredible social event. Every day, weekend or weekday, hundreds of co-eds, mostly from the University of Kentucky, make their way to their local track for an afternoon of partying.  Visitors come from all over the country.  Although they all make for a very crowded atmosphere, the hundreds of inexperienced racegoers present at Keeneland contribute to large wagering pools as well as the occasional overlay.

Keeneland Green LogoHowever, as handicappers, we require more than aesthetics when choosing which tracks to invest in.  We shouldn’t be playing a track just because it is glamorous or popular.  As handicappers looking to turn a profit, we need solid reasons to tackle a track that could easily be dubbed “the Saratoga of the Midwest.”

As Keeneland offers a unique meet, handicappers should first understand how the 16-day condition book is written. The racing cards cater to the high profile barns that ship in from out of state for the short meet. There are a few claiming races written, and the ones that are offer small purses in comparison to other tracks. The real reward to the Thoroughbred owner is winning a race at prestigious Keeneland.

The Racing Secretary does not card claiming races on the turf despite the fact that demand is high for these events. The only turf races are allowance events, maiden special weights and stakes. In addition to the winner’s purse, a pewter julep cup is given to the winning connections of all such races. To many owners, winning a race at Keeneland is equivalent to getting multiple pictures taken at another track.

Let’s look at a few of the valid reasons why we would want to tackle this oftentimes challenging meet.

 

1- Low Takeout

Kentucky racing offers one of the best takeout structures in the country. Straight wagers (win, place, show) are ‘taxed’ at only 16%, meaning 84% of the handle is returned to the betting public. Where it really gets good is with the exotics, especially multi-race wagers. All exotic wagers have a low 19-percent takeout, well below the national average. Compare this to the fact that many of the top tracks in the nation have takeouts of 23% or higher for wagers such as Trifectas, Superfectas, Pick-4’s and Pick-6’s. Keeneland is bargain hunting for the shrewd horseplayers who factor in the price of their wagers.  This is one of the major reasons that Keeneland always ranks very highly in the annual HANA Track Ranking report.

2- Quality Racing

Keeneland offers a short condition book that is jam-packed with great racing. As mentioned, the racing cards cater to the high profile barns that ship in from out of state, so the condition book and daily cards reflect this. There is a stakes race nearly every day, and always part of the popular late Pick-4 wager.

Several horses will prep at Keeneland for the upcoming Breeders’ Cup at Santa Anita at the end of the month.

“Our number one goal is to provide the best racing program in the country,” stated Vice President of Racing W.B. Rogers Beasley. “We are exceptionally proud of this schedule and the exciting racing and wagering opportunities it offers our horsemen and fans.”

3- Turf Racing

Opened in 1984, the beautiful Keeneland turf course is one of the few sand-based turf courses in United States along with Churchill Downs, Tampa Bay Downs and Turf Paradise.

The Keeneland grass course consistently benefits closers. One must be an exceptional horse, or find the rare field with absolutely no pace, in order to wire a turf field here. Most front-runners collapse at the 1/8th pole while the winner is often seen making a sweeping, strong rally on the outside.

Always be on the lookout for runners from top turf barns such as Glen Hills Farm and Augustin Stables.  It’s surprising how often they will score at a price.

Finally, look for horses that have run well over this grass course in the past. These horses for courses often run well again at Keeneland, winning or finding their way into the exotics at a price.

4- The Trainers

Many barns point for this meeting and arrive loaded for bear. There are also many fine local trainers who fare exceptionally well during the short meet, and knowing who they are behooves the horseplayer.  Every spring and fall, author and handicapper Art Parker updates his very comprehensive trainer database and he compiles the results in the bi-annual guide “Keeneland Winning Trainer Patterns.”  [Just released here on AGameofSkill.com]

Parker’s digital book covers all the horsemen who have won races over the past nine Keeneland meets, and most importantly, how they did.  Were the winners making class changes?  Surface changes?  What kind of work pattern did they have coming into the race?  What jockey did they use and who were the owners? Parker details just how these horses were prepared by their winning trainer, providing players invaluable insight into the methods of these successful horsemen.

With Parker’s book, for example, you’ll learn not only how often trainer Tom Amoss wins with layoff horses (an amazing 10 of his 22 winners), but also the other angles that go along with those winning runners. Or how about local trainer Rick Hiles, whose three winners all sported the same handicapping pattern and won at odds of 9/2, 21-1, and 39-1, respectively.  If a trainer has won at Keeneland, you’ll gain insight into how they did it.  As you can see, it’s a great guide for players that like to dive into the raw data.

5- Track Bias on the Main

Exploiting the Keeneland track biases used to be one of the many reasons that professional players salivated at the thought of opening day. The old dirt oval could be one of the most biased courses in the country and ‘being tuned into it’ proved to be very lucrative.  Many handicappers believe that went out the window when management switched to Polytrack.  That is not entirely true.  The Keeneland Polytrack would oftentimes be very biased, especially when weather changed in the Bluegrass state.  Now we’re back to dirt and it will behoove the horseplayer to pay close attention to how the new main track plays on the first couple days of racing, especially the first couple of races each afternoon.

One factor you can almost always rely on involves two-turn races on the dirt, specifically the 1 1/16-mile events. The starting gate for this commonly run distance is close to the first turn and the stretch run is short, ending at the first finish line, making it conducive to horses with tactical speed breaking from inside posts.  I expect this long-term trend to remain with the new track in place.

6- Focus on the Premier Jocks

At meets such as Keeneland, it is not surprising that the high-profile riders win most of the races. The best jockey agents get the best mounts for their riders, and the result is a lot of victories for a select few number of jockeys.

The first few days usually set the tone for the remainder of the meet. Stay away jockeys who start off cold. These jockeys rarely recover from a poor start at Keeneland and will subsequently burn a lot of money.

7- Wagering Menu

If there is a wager you like, Keeneland pretty much has it. With rolling Pick-3s, dime Superfectas, and early and late Pick-4 wagers with guaranteed pools, Keeneland offers a comprehensive wagering menu.  It’s a far cry from one of the first times I visited the track in the late 1980s.  In one race I liked two horses ridden by Pat Day and Randy Romero, respectively, and both were juicy odds of 8-1.  Needless to say, this was a rare occurrence at this track for either rider.  There was no exacta in the race, and I had to sit there in frustration as the future Hall of Fame riders ran one-two.

Fall meet edition 2014

Learn more about Art’s book

Summary

Keeneland offer the best of everything, from low takeouts to just overall great racing.  If you are fortunate enough to attend this track in person, you’ll likely enjoy a wonderful day of horse racing.  Spending an afternoon in Lexington, attending live racing, can remind us why we fell in love with this sport in the first place.  Good luck!

Seven Reasons to Tackle Keeneland

Know thy Keeneland Trainers By Rich Nilsen

Gracing a picturesque stretch of Kentucky bluegrass that is surrounded by some of the country’s most beautiful farms, Keeneland Racecourse is unique in its beauty and history.  Visit Keeneland once and you will quickly see that it is an incredible social event. Every day, weekend or weekday, hundreds of co-eds, mostly from the University of Kentucky, make their way to their local track for an afternoon of partying.  Visitors come from all over the country.  Although they all make for a very crowded atmosphere, the hundreds of inexperienced racegoers present at Keeneland contribute to large wagering pools as well as the occasional overlay.

However, as handicappers, we require more than aesthetics when choosing which tracks to invest in.  We shouldn’t be playing a track just because it is glamorous or popular.  As handicappers looking to turn a profit, we need solid reasons to tackle a track that could easily be dubbed “the Saratoga of the Midwest.”

As Keeneland offers a unique meet, handicappers should first understand how the 16-day condition book is written. The racing cards cater to the high profile barns that ship in from out of state for the short meet. There are a few claiming races written, and the ones that are offer small purses in comparison to other tracks. The real reward to the Thoroughbred owner is winning a race at prestigious Keeneland.

The Racing Secretary does not card claiming races on the turf despite the fact that demand is high for these events. The only turf races are allowance events, maiden special weights and stakes. In addition to the winner’s purse, a pewter julep cup is given to the winning connections of all such races. To many owners, winning a race at Keeneland is equivalent to getting multiple pictures taken at another track.

Let’s look at a few of the valid reasons why we would want to tackle this oftentimes challenging meet.

 1- Low Takeout

Kentucky racing offers one of the best takeout structures in the country. Straight wagers (win, place, show) are ‘taxed’ at only 16%, meaning 84% of the handle is returned to the betting public. Where it really gets good is with the exotics, especially multi-race wagers. All exotic wagers have a low 19-percent takeout, well below the national average. Compare this to the fact that many of the top tracks in the nation have takeouts of 23% or higher for wagers such as Trifectas, Superfectas, Pick-4’s and Pick-6’s. Keeneland is bargain hunting for the shrewd horseplayers who factor in the price of their wagers.  This is one of the major reasons that Keeneland always ranks very highly in the annual HANA Track Ranking report.

 2- Quality Racing

Keeneland offers a 15-day condition book this spring that is jam-packed with great racing. In fact there are 16 stakes races totaling $3.75 million in purses. As mentioned, the racing cards cater to the high profile barns that ship in from out of state, so the condition book and daily cards reflect this. There is a stakes race nearly every day, always part of the popular late Pick-4 wager.

The Central Bank Ashland and Toyota Blue Grass are worth a hefty 100 points each to the winners on the Road to the Kentucky Oaks (G1) and Road to the Kentucky Derby (G1), respectively.

 “Our number one goal is to provide the best racing program in the country,” stated Vice President of Racing W.B. Rogers Beasley. “We are exceptionally proud of this schedule and the exciting racing and wagering opportunities it offers our horsemen and fans.”

Five graded stakes, including three Grade 1 events, worth a total of $1,625,000 will rank Toyota Blue Grass Day as one of the nation’s strongest race cards. The undercard will feature the $300,000 Madison (G1), for older fillies and mares going seven furlongs; the $300,000 Jenny Wiley (G1), for older fillies and mares at 1 1/16 miles on the turf; the $175,000 Commonwealth (G3), for older horses at seven furlongs; and the $100,000 Shakertown (G3), for older horses at 5½ furlongs on the turf.  Racing cards don’t get a whole lot better than this.

3- Turf Racing

Opened in 1984, the beautiful Keeneland turf course is one of the few sand-based turf courses in United States along with Churchill Downs, Tampa Bay Downs and Turf Paradise.

The Keeneland grass course consistently benefits closers. One must be an exceptional horse, or find the rare field with absolutely no pace, in order to wire a turf field here. Most front-runners collapse at the 1/8th pole while the winner is often seen making a sweeping, strong rally on the outside.

Always be on the lookout for runners from top turf barns such as Glen Hills Farm and Augustin Stables.  It’s surprising how often they will score at a price.

Finally, look for horses that have run well over this grass course in the past. These horses for courses often run well again at Keeneland, winning or finding their way into the exotics at a price.

4- The Trainers

Many barns point for this meeting and arrive loaded for bear. There are also many fine local trainers who fare exceptionally well during the short meet, and knowing who they are behooves the horseplayer.  Every spring and fall, author and handicapper Art Parker updates his very comprehensive trainer database and he compiles the results in the bi-annual guide “Keeneland Winning Trainer Patterns.”

Parker’s digital book covers all the horsemen who have won races over the past eight Keeneland meets, and most importantly, how they did.  Were the winners making class changes?  Surface changes?  What kind of work pattern did they have coming into the race?  What jockey did they use and who were the owners? Parker details just how these horses were prepared by their winning trainer, providing players invaluable insight into the methods of these successful horsemen.

With Parker’s book, for example, you’ll learn not only how often trainer Tom Amoss wins with layoff horses (9 of his 17 winners), but also the workout patterns of those winning runners. Or how about local trainer Rick Hiles, whose three winners all sported the same handicapping pattern and won at odds of 9/2, 21-1, and 39-1, respectively.  If a trainer has won at Keeneland, you’ll gain insight into how they did it.  It’s a great guide for players that like to dive into the raw data.

Parker’s “Keeneland Winning Trainer Patterns” is available free to members of BetPTC.com [enter promo code “AGOS” when joining] or can purchased here at my website, agameofskill.com.

5- Track Bias on the Main

Exploiting the Keeneland track biases used to be one of the many reasons that professional players salivated at the thought of opening day. The old dirt oval could be one of the most biased courses in the country and ‘being tuned into it’ proved to be very lucrative.  Many handicappers believe that went out the window when management switched to Polytrack.  That is not entirely true.  The Keeneland Polytrack can oftentimes be very biased, especially when weather changes in the Bluegrass state.

One factor you can almost always rely on involves two-turn races on the dirt, specifically the 1 1/16-mile events. The starting gate for this commonly run distance is close to the first turn and the stretch run is short, ending at the first finish line, making it conducive to horses with tactical speed breaking from inside posts.

  6- Focus on the Premier Jocks

At meets such as Keeneland, it is not surprising that the high-profile riders win most of the races. The best jockey agents get the best mounts for their riders, and the result is a lot of victories for a select few number of jockeys.

The first few days usually set the tone for the remainder of the meet. Stay away jockeys who start off cold. These jockeys rarely recover from a poor start at Keeneland and will subsequently burn a lot of money.

7- Wagering Menu

If there is a wager you like, Keeneland pretty much has it. With rolling Pick-3s, dime Superfectas, and early and late Pick-4 wagers with guaranteed pools, Keeneland offers a comprehensive wagering menu.  It’s a far cry from one of the first times I visited the track in the late 1980s.  In one race I liked two horses ridden by Pat Day and Randy Romero, respectively, and both were juicy odds of 8-1.  Needless to say, this was a rare occurrence at this track for either rider.  There was no exacta in the race, and I had to sit there in frustration as the future Hall of Fame riders ran one-two.

Summary

Keeneland offer the best of everything, from low takeouts to just overall great racing.  If you are fortunate enough to attend this track in person, you’ll likely enjoy a wonderful day of horse racing.  Spending an afternoon in Lexington attending live racing can remind us why we fell in love with this sport in the first place.  Best of luck!

MISSED THESE GEMS?

A Profitable Idea for Trips & Trainers

13 Mistakes Horseplayers Need to Avoid in the New Year

A Method for Attacking Lightly Raced Horses

Interview with George Woolf winner, jockey Mario Pino

Keeneland Trainer Book now available for 2013 Fall Meet

KEENELAND WINNING TRAINER PATTERNS

– 2013 FALL MEET EDITION – Now available

Winning Patterns on 110 Trainers!  Bonus Handicapping Articles

50 Trainers have accounted for nearly 72% of all Keeneland wins.  It’s time you know how they did it!

Keeneland Fall 2013 meet

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If you handicap the races at Keeneland, then understanding the tendencies of the trainers is paramount to success. Keeneland Winning Trainer Patterns for 2013 is based on the extensive database of handicapper and author Art Parker, a regular contributor here on Agameofskill.com. It’s bigger and better than ever with no less than 110 winning trainers profiled!

In this unique trainer guide, Parker analyzes the winning patterns of the most successful horsemen that race at Keeneland. With this data right at your fingertips, you will know the winning tendencies of each and every trainer that has saddled multiple winners at Keenland over the past 7 race meets.

 

“It’s a wealth of information for horseplayers serious about attacking the Keeneland meets.” – publisher Rich Nilsen

The 2013 Fall Meet Edition of “Keeneland Winning Trainer Patterns” is now available from publisher All Star Press.

We’ve put trainers, Keeneland, and the past 7 meetings together (3 1/2 years) to try and have the best results possible for the upcoming fall meet, 2013. Our focus is on the trainers that do more than show up and win a race. We have detailed the individuals from the last seven meetings that were multiple winning trainers. In other words, a trainer had to collect at least two victories to be recognized.

 Winning Trainers – Last 7 Meets – Alpha Order
 Winning Trainers – Last 7 Meets – By Number of Winners
 Winning Trainers – Last 7 Meets – The Details for Each Winner

Just how good were the multiple winning trainers? Here are a few facts from 2010 – 13 that validate the importance of these successful trainers.

Keeneland held 1,063 thoroughbred races collectively in the seven meets dating back to the spring of 2010.

Trainers winning at least 2 races in these seven seasons totaled 111.

The 111 multiple winners won a total of 960 races collectively or 90.30% of all races.

Of the 111 multiple winners, 50 trainers won at least 5 races.

Those 50 trainers collected a total of 764 wins or 71.8% of all races. 

The details of all the winning trainers and their corresponding victories over the past 7 seasons at Keeneland are presented to handicappers in this book, Keeneland Winning Trainer Patterns. A one-of-a-kind publication.

Only $9.97 now through PayPal. One ‘hit” will pay for this book 10x over.  Download it today to any PC or Mobile Device!

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Attention KINDLE users – the book is now available through Amazon for Kindle e-Reader, Tablet or Apps