Crush Keeneland with the Best Trainer Pattern Book

Rich Nilsen 13x NHC Qualifier

One score will more than pay for this book.  Our AGOS contributer Art Parker has a one-of-kind database on all the Keeneland trainers.  No one understands how these horsemen win better that Art. This year's guide is better than ever and now in a more user-friendly format.  It's a wealth of information for players wanting to attack the upcoming Keeneland meets.

Completely revamped. The 2017 Keeneland Winning Trainer Patterns by Art Parker is now available.

Over 50 Trainers covered with a detailed summary of how they win!

Longshot horsemen identified for easy reference.

KEENELAND WINNING TRAINERS taps into Art Parker’s personal database and gives you the detailed pattern summaries on the 51 trainers, explaining exactly how they win at this prestigious meet.

Keeneland Winning Trainer Patterns bookHow do they win? What handicapping patterns do they use?

How do they work their horses prior to victory?

Do they bring home horses at a price?

Do they score off the layoff?

What owners & jockeys do they team up with?

and much more.

Author and Agameofskill.com contributor Art Parker has taken a hard look into his comprehensive personal database to uncover the trainers that win the majority of races at the meet – the 51 Kings of Keeneland – with a close look at how they accomplish this.

This one-of-a-kind handicapping book includes three bonus handicapping articles written by veteran turf writers Art Parker and Rich Nilsen

The 2017 Annual Edition of “Keeneland Winning Trainers” is published by All Star Press LLC.
Buy Now

Handicapper Art ParkerQUICK & EASY DOWNLOAD TO ANY DEVICE

You can put this comprehensive trainer guide on any PC or Mobile Device, and then easily look up the Kings of Keeneland when you are ready to handicap or play a race! Only $14.97 for the complete 33-page, jam packed book.

THAT’S LESS THAN 30 CENTS PER TRAINER

The Kindle version on Amazon is available here

Plans to Bring Horseracing to London’s streets

NOT one but two companies are in competition to bring horseracing to the streets of London’s city centre.

Source: Plans to bring horseracing to London’s streets

Casino’s Impact on PA’s Horse Racing Industry

racino slots machine Annual Report on Casino Gaming’s Impact on PA’s Horse Racing Industry Published by PA Gaming Control Board

HARRISBURG, Pa., April 19, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Slot machine gaming in Pennsylvania generated $246 million to support the state’s horse racing industry, according to the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board’s annual Racetrack Casino Benchmark Report, released today. The report, which covers calendar year 2015, is the 9 th compiled by the Gaming Control Board detailing the impact… [Read more…]

Horse Racing Handicapping is a Process

How to invest in horse racing

by Glen S. for Agameofskill.com

Do you have a process in handicapping a race? If you say “NO”, you are already behind the eight ball. If the answer is “YES”, then the next question: is it a successful one that makes you money?

There are many successful ways to process a race. Everyone is a little different in getting the correct result. Here is mine:

Step 1: Check the race distance and conditions. (self explanatory but kind of important) along with the betting options.

Step 2: Scan the entire field first, jockeys, trainers, last race and date, and workouts.

I find it important to get an overall perception of all the horses as a group first. Make some quick notes on each horse. This first scan gives you an idea of the level of competition.

Step 3: Now start to get some race shape of the field.

Find the early pace horses (the ‘need the lead’ ones if there are any in the field), stalker and closers. This part of the process is a absolute must. If there is a lone speed horse in the field that instantly makes that runner a contender

Step 4: Next, start to look at each horse a little more individually.

Confirm running style, and ask the question: is the horse in improving form or declining form? What is the top effort of the horse and can they run that today? I use the “Horse Street Par times” quite regularly, especially on the tracks I play (that is another blog entirely) to give me figures at where they might be throughout the race.  Perform a quick scan of the beyer’s figures simply to see their average level. I do not live or die on these figures.  The main reason for that is because too many people use these ratings and they effect the price (odds of the horses) too much.

Step 5: At this point I will have my contenders and pretenders.  I will view the replays of the contenders for sure, especially if the comments have a trouble line or many have run against each other. Replays are so valuable, because you can spot things that can’t be seen in numbers.

Step 6: By now I will have an idea in the direction I want to bet. If there is a standout in my mind that becomes a win bet.  I may throw a few runners that I like in an exacta box. If I have a top horse or two and then a few at each level then maybe a trifecta wheel comes to mind. I do not restrict myself on the same types of bets in each race. It all depends on what I come up with is how I bet the race; it may also mean passing a race and moving on.  With this type of handicapping process, you can become more successful at the races and enjoy it that much more.

– Of note, the first two steps of the process for myself usually occurs the night before and then I go with step three the next day. For me it really sets myself up for a strong day and clear vision day of racing, and saves a lot of time on race day.

I could write a short novel on the process but I tried to keep it as short and ‘to the point’ as I could. Any comments good or bad are always welcome. I am always willing to learn; everyone should want to improve their process in ‘capping races.

A Better Presentation is What Horse Racing Needs

Racing needs a better presentation, TVBy Art Parker

Thoroughbred racing requires us to fight an ongoing battle, a battle for survival. I am not going to point out the mistakes we made over the years. I use the word we because I am convinced we must all fight this battle to make sure our sport not only is trying to grow, but trying its best to survive. Today the battle is to garner new faces, new blood, new fans, and preferably those in the demographic of young adults. We need to do this with an old sport.

Trying to put anything old with something new has never been easy, if it was, then teenagers would love to go see old folks on their birthday and give the real old aunt a big smack on the lips. And we know that doesn’t happen.

Besides the effort of social media and all the new bells and whistles of the high tech age, the television is still a good way to place our product before prospective fans. Justice is best served our sport when the people get its full visual effect. Watching the action of the sport can be exhilarating similar to what some folks experience watching NASCAR. But like anything else, the sale is often made not with the contents of the box, but how you wrap the package.

For many horseplayers Breeders’ Cup day is one where the action takes place at home. So many of us now play via Advance Deposit Wagering (ADW) and we utilize various resources to have all the advantages of being at the track without having to go to the track.

I’m sure many of you are like me. I play via ADW and turn the television on for the non-stop Breeders’ Cup coverage, even though the television coverage is not required to get the job done. This year the television coverage was like in the past. It is not interesting enough to watch, at least for the regular player. And, I suspect it was not interesting enough to those that are not regular players.

I didn’t watch the coverage on Friday but I did tune in Saturday and paid attention the best I could. One reason I was going to watch the Saturday coverage was to try and see the presentation as if I was a novice.

All races except the Classic were viewed on the NBC Sports network. The coverage on NBC Sports was like it always is and just not too good, in my opinion.

For the most part the coverage is boring to those that do not know the sport. A novice sits there and listens to some guy talk about Beyer Speed Numbers and there is simply no way the newcomer knows what those numbers are. It’s like those of us in the know are keeping a secret. Of course, this is just an example. The bottom line is that we do not use the opportunity to recruit new players with actions and information that will make them comfortable.

But then we left NBC Sports and went to NBC for the final hour and, of course, the feature race, the Breeders’ Cup Classic. The presentation seemed to be very much different. It was far more exciting. My wife remarked that it seemed like we were watching the Academy Awards. There was a greater romance with the horse. It seemed different and I liked it. I’m sure much of the content was considered the same by some, but what I liked was the way the package was wrapped.

What I perceived to be a good move was that the Classic hour had the possibility of recruiting new players with just downright excitement and avoided running prospective players off with mystery information. Plus, we got the biggest Breeders’ Cup moment in Prime Time. I salute NBC for what I think was a different presentation. I encourage racing’s television partners to continue to work on new ideas that will attract more participants. I hope our television partners will attempt to make future broadcasts something the younger people will call “awesome” or “cool” instead of “something the old folks like.”

 

Horse Racing is a Game of Skill…in India, too

Is horse racing handicapping a game of skill?

The current gambling laws in India are ambiguous. The Gambling Act, 1867, prohibits gambling and the setting up of gaming houses. However, it does not apply to “games of skill.”  Several court judgments have discussed the difference between “games of chance” and “games of skill”. In 1996, the Supreme Court ruled that betting on horse races is a game of skill, and not just luck. Delhi, Karnataka, Maharashtra, and Tamil Nadu allow betting on horse-racing, provided it is conducted on race courses and through licensed bookies. Gambling on rummy is also allowed.

“In a similar fashion, a game of cricket involves skills of players,” says FICCI’s Singh.

Read the rest from Business Today (India)

Horse Racing Can Move Forward off a Favorable 2012

Sheena McKenzie has written a very favorable piece for CNN on the sport of horse racing, specifically focusing on racing in the United Kingdom.

In a new digital age, their fame was carefully cultivated. Marketing teams set up Twitter accounts, Facebook profiles, and pedaled merchandise online.

And it seemed to work. Attendance at races starring Frankel were up 20% on last year…

Meanwhile, a record 130,000 punters attended the prestigious Epsom Derby in July, which launched Queen Elizabeth’s official jubilee celebrations, making it the largest sports crowd in Britain in 2012.

Read the full story here

Horse Racing Deal offered on Groupon.com

Visiting the Gulf Coast of Florida this winter? If so, don’t miss out on this online deal. Tampa Bay Downs is back at it again on Groupon.com, offering discounted packages to the days of your choice at the upcoming 2012-2013 meet. They offered these deals last year and it was a great success for the track.

Choose from Four Options:
$9 for a day at the races for one (a $20 value)

$15 for a day at the races for two (a $35 value)

$29 for a day at the races for four (a $65 value)

$42 for a day at the races for six (a $95 value)

Each person receives:

  • Valet parking
  • Clubhouse admission
  • Racing program
  • $2 betting voucher
  • $5 food voucher
  • Box seats

Click here to join Groupon and then choose “Tampa Bay” for the city to find this deal.

Tampa Bay Downs grandstand   copyright AGameofSkill.com

copyright AGameofSkill.com

About Tampa Bay Downs (according to the Groupon website)
At Tampa Bay Downs, thoroughbred horses burst through the starting gates while spectators cheer for their picks and spend an afternoon basking in the amenity-rich premises. Visitors can wager on live and simulcast races, or wander into The Silks Poker Room and hunker down for a game of Texas Hold’em. The racetrack features numerous restaurants, grills, and bars as well as a fully-lit, 22-acre golf practice facility with all-Bermuda grass hitting stations, chipping greens, and a covered range.

Recap of the 2012 Breeders’ Cup Selections from AGameofSkill.com

TRINNIBERG, Breeders' Cup Sprint winner.

TRINNIBERG, Breeders' Cup Sprint winner. copyright Dennis Donohue.

Horse racing handicapping is a game of skill. Period.  Experienced horseplayers have an edge over less experienced players, but the beautiful thing about this sport is that one is always learning. Even the novice player can “out-handicap” or I should say outperform the more experienced horseplayer on any given day.  There is always something to learn in this game and there are always ways to improve one’s handicapping.

Last weekend (Nov. 2-3) I offered my Breeders’ Cup analysis in a paid format for the first time ever. I didn’t like the Friday card and the results showed that. I warned readers to tread lightly on Friday for that very reason.

However, I loved Saturday’s card and fortunately things came together as hoped. As part of the full-card analysis, I also recommended 5 spot plays/wagering suggestions.

Here is a recap of the Saturday Breeders’ Cup Spot Plays analysis.

Race 4                   Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf

Top pick 4-1 Noble Tune finished 2nd. No spot play given.

Race 5                   Breeders’ Cup Filly & Mare

Top choice Groupie Doll won, paying $3.40. Spot play – recommended keying her in multi-race wagers. $12.00 Exacta wager given out.

Race 6                   Breeders’ Cup Dirt Mile

3rd choice Tapizar scored big upset to the tune of $32.60. No spot play given.

Race 7                   Breeders’ Cup Turf Sprint

Spot play and Top choice Mizdirection won to the tune of $15.80, $7.40, $5.00. Recommended using in multi-race wagers and betting her across the board. Ending Pick-4 wager paid $1,757.65 for a buck.

Race 8                   Breeders’ Cup Juvenile

3rd choice Shanghai Bobby won. No spot play given.

Race 9                   Breeders’ Cup Turf

Spot play and top choice Point Of Entry ran 2nd.  Recommend using over Little Mike (among others) in an exacta.

Race 10                  Breeders’ Cup Sprint

Spot play and Top choice Trinniberg scored to the tune of $29.40, $13.20, $11.00.     Also, huge $203.40 exacta given out cold with 2nd choice The Lumber Guy! I have a new favorite horse and his name is Trinniberg.

Race 11                  Breeders’ Cup Mile

3rd choice Wise Dan wins.  No spot play given.

Race 12                  Breeders’ Cup Classic

3rd choice Fort Larned win, paying $20.80. Trifecta paid $713.80.  Spot play using Flat Out lost.

Does Horse Racing Know Its Audience?

Gary West writes for ESPN:

Horse Racing Fans at the Saratoga Clubhouse Rail

Fans at the Saratoga Clubhouse Rail

“Twice a week, Amelia and Juan Rojas journey 40 miles from Waxahachie, Texas, to Lone Star Park at Grand Prairie. At the racetrack’s renovated simulcast facility known as the Bar & Book, they typically spend the entire day. Seated comfortably at their carrels, they watch the action on individualized television monitors and bet on races from New York to California. This time of year, they follow the sport from Saratoga to Del Mar, with simulcast excursions to various racing locales in between.

Some racetracks lavish thousands of dollars on popular musical performers that can be magnets for youngsters who, in some cases, aren’t old enough to bet. They might not seem very unlike many of the sport’s most devoted fans, except for one thing. She’s 102, and he’s 101.”   Read the rest of the story