Drone wars over UK racetracks after courses say live streams are illegal

Best UK horse racing events for the rest of 2019A long-running dispute between racecourses and drone operators streaming live action from tracks appeared to escalate on Friday as David Armstrong, the chief executive of the Racecourse Association, warned that a new streaming service advertised on Twitter on Thursday is “breaking the law”, and that the RCA “will not allow that to carry on”.

FoxFly, a company based in the east Midlands, is believed to be responsible for many of the drones which have become a familiar sight around British racecourses in recent years. The drones send streams with little or no delay – known as latency – to punters betting in-running on the Betfair betting exchange, giving them an important edge over backers watching coverage on Racing TV or Sky Sports Racing.

tweet from FoxFly’s account on Thursday afternoon announced a “live aerial streaming service from all racecourses from Monday 15th February”, with “the quickest and best pictures guaranteed”. A subsequent tweet said that the service “will only be available to 10 people who are willing to travel to our offices”.

The Guardian understands that anyone responding to the tweet was quoted a price of between £100 and £200 per day to use the service, depending on…