All Bets on Yellow: Double Free Spins Bonus Roulette in Sweden

Guest post

 

Roulette is definitely one of the easiest casino games to play. Its rules are so simple that you don’t need to even memorize it all. You only have to bet, see the dealer spin the wheel, then let the ivory ball decide your wager’s fate. Roulette is also famed for its very fast pace and its near fifty-fifty chances of winning. Thus, many gamblers have flocked to it, admiring its streamlined design and enjoying the very exciting feel there is in every spin.

That said, one can conclude that roulette is a very successful casino game. It’s now so popular in casinos that almost nobody remembered how it started from a derivative of a perpetual motion machine created by the French inventor Blaise Pascal. Who can blame this majority of roulette players? After all, roulette has evolved far beyond its origins and has given way to countless variations.

Roulette Normally, people will always think of American and European roulette once roulette variations come to mind. American roulette is a version known for its two zero slots and for having a high house edge, while European roulette is a more internationally popular variant for having a single zero roulette wheel, and therefore, higher winning odds. However, these aren’t the only forms of roulette. There are countless others, some of which have been popularized by online roulette casinos.

One of these variations is the double bonus free spins roulette, which as we can agree, has a rather mouthful name. This version of the casino game is distinct for having a yellow “B” slot, which is considered a single bet but with a higher payout. This is 50% larger than the usual pocket, giving the ball better chances of landing on it. Once the ball lands on this slot, you’ll be awarded with two free spins, whether you have placed chips on it or in a different number. As you have probably guessed, this feature is where the double bonus spins roulette got its name.

As previously mentioned, you can also place a bet on the lone yellow slot. You can actually make three kinds of wagers on this particular betting space. The first is the straight yellow bet that wins 12:1, or twelve times your bet. However, if the yellow comes up again in the resulting bonus spin, you’ll win 120:1, and if the same occurs in the third spin, you’ll get a whopping 1200:1 win!

The other two bets are the Split and Trio yellow bets. The first is a bet placed on the yellow B plus another placed on green 0 or 00, paying out 6:1. The second is played in a similar manner, this time covering both green slots and pays 4:1.

As you can notice, double free spins bonus roulette is played on an American live roulette online wheel and that perhaps is its biggest disadvantage. Fortunately, what extra house edge created by the zeros and the yellow slot is negated by the rare bonus spins, should yellow B ever come up at all.

Nevertheless, that doesn’t mean that you won’t find enjoyment in this version of live roulette online. The free bonus certainly is an interesting spin to the game, and the progressive win on yellow is something you’ll really hope for.

 

Betfair Moves NJ Online Gaming Operation to Golden Nugget Atlantic City

JERSEY CITY, N.J., Nov. 18, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Betfair, one of the world’s leading online gaming operators, has moved its online gaming operation to the Golden Nugget Atlantic City. Under New Jersey law, online gaming operators such as Betfair must operate under the Internet gaming permit of a land-based casino in Atlantic City. As a result…

TED Presentation: What We Can Learn from Expert Gamblers

The presentation of this short 15 minute video is Dylan Evans.  He is the founder of Projection Point, a global leader in risk intelligence solutions. Evans has written several popular science books, including Risk Intelligence: How to Live with Uncertainty and Emotion: The Science of Sentiment. He received a PhD in Philosophy from the London School of Economics in 2000, and has held academic appointments at King’s College London, the University of Bath, the University of the West of England, and the American University of Beirut.

His topic: What We Can Learn from Expert Gamblers

httpv://youtu.be/7jyokhjUCyk

Seven-figure score by Poker Pro in Serious Jeopardy

Earlier this year poker star and professional Blair Hinkle won over $1.2 million in a Full Tilt Online Poker Series (FTOPS) main event. Hinkle’s prize was one of the largest the site had ever awarded, and it coincided with the company’s alleged insolvency. However, he had no way of knowing that his seven-figure cash award was in serious danger, or that his winnings existed partly as what authorities have called “phantom funds” within the Full Tilt poker site.

According to Hinkle, the company took about a month to respond to his emails asking to raise his $8,000 per-day limit on cashing out. The site then asked him to re-verify his account. By the time the process was over, it was April and Black Friday had hit the poker community. Furthermore, none of his requests to withdraw just $48,000 of his winnings had been successful.

Memo to Hinkle and the thousands of online poker players in the United States: online poker is illegal! It doesn’t matter whether or not you think it should be legal. It isn’t.

Hinkle is under the delusion he will see his money some day. Read his thoughts at Card Player

Devastating news for the Illegal online Poker Industry

FullTiltPoker.com

NEW YORK (Reuters) – U.S. prosecutors made new allegations on Tuesday in a probe of the Full Tilt Poker website, accusing self-styled “Poker Professor” Howard Lederer and professional poker champion Christopher Ferguson and others of paying themselves more than $440 million while defrauding other players.

In a motion filed in federal court in New York to amend an earlier civil complaint, the prosecutors accused Full Tilt Poker of running a Ponzi scheme that continued even after the original charges were filed.

Prosecutors unsealed the earlier charges on April 15, accusing three Internet poker companies — Full Tilt Poker, Absolute Poker and PokerStars — and 11 people, including Full Tilt director Raymond Bitar, of bank fraud, illegal gambling and money laundering offenses.

Lederer is described on his website as “The Poker Professor” and Ferguson has won five World Series of Poker events. The men are directors and owners of Full Tilt Poker.

“In reality, Full Tilt Poker did not maintain funds sufficient to repay all players, and in addition, the company used player funds to pay board members and other owners more than $440 million since April 2007,” the office of Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said in a statement.

“Full Tilt was not a legitimate poker company, but a global Ponzi scheme.”

A Ponzi scheme is usually one in which early investors are paid with the money of new clients and it collapses when funds run out.

The U.S. Attorney’s previous civil complaint did not contain allegations of the company defrauding players or owners taking payments improperly.

Representatives of Full Tilt Poker could not immediately be reached to comment on the amended complaint, which has yet to be approved by a U.S. District Court judge. This type of filing is usually approved as a formality.

The prosecutors said Full Tilt Poker’s board of directors, including Bitar, Lederer, Ferguson and Rafael Furst, defrauded players by misrepresenting that their funds in accounts were safe, secure and available for withdrawal.

In the new complaint, they cited emails and poker message board postings in 2008 and 2009 in which Full Tilt Poker and its representatives assured players their money was safe.

One of those emails read, in part: “To protect both our players and business from financial problems, all player account funds are segregated and held separately from our operating accounts. Unlike some companies in our industry, we completely understand and accept that your account money belongs to you, not Full Tilt Poker.”

The government challenges the assurances, saying the company did not have money to repay the players.

The case is USA v Pokerstars, et al, U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, No. 11-02564.