Got Questions about Horse Racing?

Q: Now that Swiss Skydiver has shown she can beat the colts, I think it’s time for her connections to run her in the Breeders’ Cup Classic. What do you think?

A: Beating the boys in the Preakness Stakes is one thing, but beating them in the $6 million Classic is quite another. In the 36 previous runnings, Zenyatta (2009) is the only female to win the race in one of the most thrilling moments in Santa Anita’s history.

Swiss Skydiver’s connections have indicated they favor the Breeders’ Cup Distaff over the Classic, and that’s the way I’d go if she was my filly. But consider this: If she runs in the Classic and wins, she’s hands down the Horse of the Year. There’s not even a debate…

Industry Profile: Bruce Lunsford, Art Collector’s Owner

LOUISVILLE — Bruce Lunsford, who will have his first Preakness Stakes (G1) entrant when Art Collector takes on Kentucky Derby winner Authentic Saturday at Pimlico, knows something about tough races and taking on formidable opponents.

After all, as the Democratic nominee for Kentucky’s U.S. Senate seat in 2008, he gave Mitch McConnell the closest call of the Senate Majority Leader’s long political career.

“Oh sure, even in politics there’s a common thread,” said Lunsford, comparing it to horse racing. “I went into a race that nobody thought I could win. I was 25 points behind; I was tied with two weeks to go. It was like the stretch drive. It was fun, exhilarating, and I got to meet a lot of people. Mitch and I still have a decent relationship today. I think he respected what I did, and I saw where he was quoted as saying the only time he’d had his people write a concession letter was in the race with me. Because two weeks out, it looked like we were going to win.”

The 72-year-old entrepreneur and philanthropist from Louisville has been many things: Founder of a Fortune 500 company, investor in a myriad of start-up companies, producer of movies, partner in the Kentucky Kingdom amusement park and Hurricane Bay water park. He worked in state government as Kentucky’s commerce secretary. Now Lunsford would love nothing more than to add classic-winning horse owner and breeder.

Art Collector, out of Lunsford’s mare Distorted Legacy, is his first Preakness entrant and his second in the Triple Crown, following Vision and Verse, the 1999 Belmont Stakes (G1) runner-up to Lemon Drop Kid at odds of 54-1. Art Collector — who is 4- for-4 this year, including the $200,000 RUNHAPPY Ellis Park Derby and Keeneland’s Toyota Blue Grass (G2) — was supposed to be the first Kentucky Derby starter for Lunsford and trainer Tommy Drury.

Within days of being fulfilled, that Derby dream was derailed when Art Collector sustained a minor and fleeting, but untimely, foot issue. A month later they are back on solid ground for another swing in the Triple Crown.

“It’s the only thing you work on, probably, that you spend weeks and days and everything to get ready and it lasts two minutes or less,” Lunsford said. “So a lot of stuff is just outside your control. I do like the way this horse runs. They all have to get out of the gate. We’ve seen a lot of horses over the years who are really good break bad and it takes them out of the action. This horse has not shown a propensity to do that. If he gets in the flow and we get a fair trip, I’ve got to like our chances to hit the board. Anything above that gets to be gravy. But a lot of the handicappers all of a sudden are picking him. So I don’t know exactly what that means.”

Lunsford wonders how the Derby might have been different had Art Collector been in the field, given that his horse and jockey Brian Hernandez Jr. logically figured to put more pressure than the front-running winner Authentic faced in his absence.

“The good thing is that speculation doesn’t matter, because we’re going to get a chance to run against each other,” Lunsford said. “I’m hopeful both have a good trip, and I’d love to see them down the stretch together. I’ll take my chances.”

Lunsford grew up in Kenton County in northern Kentucky near Cincinnati, his dad a union shop steward who wound up buying a small farm. Young Lunsford got interested in horse racing while attending the University of Kentucky and going to Keeneland. In the summers he’d go to Ellis Park with his fraternity brother and close friend Greg Hudson, whose dad owned horses.

A CPA who also received a law degree from Northern Kentucky University, Lunsford in his early 30s was Kentucky’s commerce secretary under John Y. Brown. In that capacity, he helped bring United Parcel Service’s worldwide air hub to Louisville and was involved with launching the Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts.

A few years later, Lunsford got into horse ownership by claiming a couple of cheap horses with his pal Hudson.

“The good news or bad news, whichever way you look at it, both of them won about $100,000,” he said. “So we thought this game is easy. We found out later it’s a little more complicated.”

A couple of years later, Lunsford wanted to get involved in the breeding side of racing. He purchased one of his first broodmare prospects in 1994, paying $500,000 for a 3-year-old filly out of the Greentree Stable dispersal upon the advice of Claiborne Farm head Seth Hancock.

“You know Bruce, he wanted action,” Hancock recalled. “We said, ‘Well look here. You can have your cake and eat it too. Greentree is dispersing these things, and here’s a pretty good racemare who’s got a great pedigree. You’ll have some fun running her and maybe we can make a pretty decent broodmare out of her.’ ”

That half-million dollar filly, Bunting, had one win out of 13 starts for her prior connections, but she also finished second in Keeneland’s Ashland (G1) and Pimlico’s Black-Eyed Susan (G2). In four starts for Lunsford, she won a Gulfstream Park allowance race before being retired to Claiborne Farm. She proved far better than pretty decent as a broodmare.

Bunting’s first foal was Vision and Verse, who won the Illinois Derby G2) and also was second in the Travers Stakes while earning $1 million. Her 11th foal was a filly named Distorted Legacy, a minor stakes-winner who placed second in Belmont Park’s Flower Bowl (G1). Distorted Legacy’s second foal was Art Collector.

Until Art Collector, Lunsford’s home-run horses came around 15 years ago.

His $160,000 yearling purchase Madcap Escapade won 7 of 9 starts and more than $1 million, including Keeneland’s Ashland G1), and finished third in the 2004 Kentucky Oaks. The Frankie Brothers charge was being pointed for the 2005 Breeders’ Cup Sprint against males when she suffered a career-ending injury. He sold a half-interest in Madcap Escapade at auction for $3 million, staying in for the other half, to another trusted advisor, John Sikura, with whom Lunsford also boards mares at Hill ’N’ Dale Farm.

The Brothers-trained First Samurai, purchased as a yearling with his friend Lansdon Robbins of Louisville, won his first four starts in 2005, including New York’s Grade 1 Hopeful and Champagne before finishing third in the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile. The winner of Gulfstream Park’s Fountain of Youth (G2) upon the disqualification of Corinthian for interference, First Samurai’s Derby aspirations ended when he was injured in Keeneland’s Blue Grass. He retired to a stallion career at Claiborne.

Lunsford also bred and sold Golden Missile, winner of the Grade 1 Pimlico Special in 2000, then sold that horse’s mom, Santa Catalina, for $1.35 million five years later. He also bred and sold Canada’s 2006 Horse of the Year Arravale, a two-time Grade 1 winner.

For all his success, Lunsford knows well how difficult it is to just get to the championship races, let alone win.

“Just like the experience at the Derby,” he said. “All things went right, and then he winds up getting what is almost like an ingrown toenail. You’re talking about creatures that have large bodies and small legs. And things happen. Seth Hancock told me one time, you’ve got to learn to take the hard blows in this business… My good friend Don Dizney told me that it’s the lows that make the highs so good. There’s a lot of truth to that. If you can win 15, 20 percent of your races, they cover you pretty well. It’s like the baseball player who bats .300.”

Lunsford today is chairman and CEO of Lunsford Capital, a private investment company he founded in 2003. The companies he has founded include Vencor, a Fortune 500 company now known as Kindred Healthcare, and its spinoff real-estate company Ventas; Atria Communities, the third-largest assisted-living company in America; and Valor Healthcare, Inc., a company that develops and operates outpatient clinics for military veterans under the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

“I was a start-up guy,” he said. “Now what I do is I invest in people that I think have it. I tell people I don’t invest in financial statements, I invest in people. When I realize they have the skillset, we try to give them the things they need to do to make it work.”

Drury is an example. Lunsford one day this summer asked Drury what he had going on for the week. The trainer mentioned the various trips he’d be making up and down the highway to Belterra Park and Ellis Park. “He said, ‘Man, we’ve got to get you to the point to where you’re not bouncing around so much,’” Drury recalled. “He said, ‘Better-quality horses is going to do that to you. We need to sit down and talk.’

“And that’s the kind of guy Bruce is. He’s always willing to help others. Always willing to try to help you reach your goal and get to the next level. It’s like the Blue Grass,” Drury continued, referencing Art Collector giving him his first graded-stakes victory. “It took me a long time to get to that. He knew that and I think he was genuinely happy for me. He’s got a heart the size of Texas. It makes you want to work that much harder and want to win that much more for people like that.”

Lunsford said that at this stage of his life, he only wants to do things that are fun and challenging.

“The thing I’ve done well is I’ve built a really nice staff,” he said. “The guy who runs the whole real-estate company which is assisted living and apartments, his dad was my barber. His son Brian (Durbin) is like my right-hand man. Every time I get out of Jerry’s chair, I say, ‘I just can’t tell you how he’s changed my life.’ I have a team of about six people of his quality. I’ve built a team of people where, if I drop dead tomorrow, they can keep it going.”

Lunsford laughed when asked if he’s an under-the-radar Shark Tank.

“I can relate to everything they do, except I don’t have as much money,” he said.

So maybe a Shark Tank Lite?

“That’s right,” he said. “You know I was in the movie business for a while with Ed Hart, had about 10 movies we made. We had a lot of fun. Made a little money, lost a lot of money. But I will say one thing: I was in the two toughest business anybody can be in: the horse business and the movie business.”

Making having a horse of Art Collector’s caliber even more satisfying for the father of daughters Amy, Cindy and Brandy and grandfather to six is sharing the experience with his significant other, Eleanor Porco.

“I have a lot that I enjoy in life, because I like action a little bit,” Lunsford said. “I don’t think I’m an action junkie or anything. But this is one of those things where my friends are able to enjoy it. My two best friends are still alive. I mean, we’re at the age where that could not be true. The whole idea of having a horse of this quality and at a time in my life when I’ve really got a great soulmate with me has just really turned it into a great blessing.

“There are only so many interesting things you can do in life. Outside of having your children and things you do as a kid, sports and otherwise, when you’re older, it’s harder to keep it exciting. I’m 72 years old and my life is still exciting.”

Source: Maryland Jockey Club

‘Wise Guy’ Horse Is Out of the Derby

SAD NEWS.   KING GUILLERMO TO SCRATCH FROM KENTUCKY DERBY 146

 

LOUISVILLE, KY (Thursday, Sept. 3, 2020) – Owner Victor Martinez of Victoria’s Ranch reported Thursday that Tampa Bay Derby (GII) winner King Guillermo will be scratched from Saturday’s 146th running of the Kentucky Derby presented by Woodford Reserve (GI) due to a fever.

Trained by Juan Carlos Avila, King Guillermo was evaluated by veterinarians after the team discovered he had a fever Wednesday afternoon. Avila and Martinez made the decision Thursday to scratch the colt from Saturday’s “Run for the Roses.”

“To race in a race like the Derby we need him at 100 percent,” Avila said. “We aren’t going to be able to demonstrate how good he is like this. I think we are going to have plenty of time to show his quality. He’s going to be a great horse and everybody knows we have to take care of the horse first. The next step is to try to get him ready for the Preakness and go from there.”

Martinez added, “The sad part is that Juan said yesterday was his best day here. When we left the track in the morning following training and came back in the afternoon for feed time, we discovered he had a fever. It’s just the sad part about this game.”

The defection of King Guillermo leaves the Kentucky Derby field with 17 starters. The two inside gates and one outside gate of the new Kentucky Derby starting gate will remain open. The post positions that were drawn Tuesday remain unchanged.

Industry Profile: Owner of Kentucky Derby contender Honor A.P.

And a Horse Named After Kobe

Lee Searing fell in love with horse racing before he made it out of elementary school.

As a young boy growing up in southern California, trips to the track were a cherished family tradition for the owner of one of this year’s top Kentucky Derby contenders.

“I started going to the racetrack with my father and my mother and my grandfather when I was 8 years old, so I didn’t miss many weekends at the track,” Searing told the Herald-Leader in a phone interview. “I have very wonderful memories with my father and my grandfather and my mother with me and my brothers going to the races at Del Mar, Hollywood Park and Santa Anita.”

Searing, 73, is president of Searing Industries — the family business founded by his father which specializes in industrial tubing. He parlayed his passion for racing into a second career as a successful horse owner. Along with his wife, Susan, Searing owns C R K Stable. Lee and Susan, who met in high school and have been married for nearly 50 years, named the stable in honor of their three children: Christina, Richard and Katherine.

Are We Ready for a Classic in the Kentucky Oaks?

by Art Parker

There are two glorious weekends for all of us horseplayers. The last always comes in late October or early November – The Breeders’ Cup. The first of these weekends focuses on the first Saturday in May, which features the Kentucky Derby. This year the Derby was delayed until the first weekend of September. Now all eyes are finally on the Derby.

Churchill winner's circleHowever, the Derby may not be the best race of the weekend because among the many fantastic graded stakes is the Kentucky Oaks. I can’t help but think the 2020 Oaks will be the best race we will witness in a long time. It may remind us of great battles of the past we will never forget – Alydar and Affirmed or Easy Goer and Sunday Silence.

The Oaks will feature Bob Baffert’s Gamine and Kenny McPeek’s Swiss Skydiver. Gamine has two meanings: As an adjective, it means attractively boyish; as a noun, it means a girl with a mischievous, boyish charm. Take your pick – both meanings fit the speedball named Gamine.

Gamine is far less experienced than Swiss Skydiver, even though she has handled all situations as if she has been around a race track forever.

Swiss Skydiver has run five times since late March and won four of those. The only time she ran second was against the boys in the Blue Grass at Keeneland, and it was a good second. When it comes to her gender, she has destroyed the hopes of young girls she has faced – just like Gamine.

Gamine sent notice that she was for real when set a stakes record in the one turn Acorn Stakes at Belmont of 1:32 2/5 on June 20, less than a couple of hours before Tiz the Law won the Belmont Stakes. Quite a performance when one considers that Johnny Velazquez kept Gamine away from the rail despite having the lead. She won by more than 18 lengths and did it with incredible ease. If you want to consider how good she is, look at the times of her race and that of Tiz the Law in the Belmont Stakes. Although Gamine only went a mile while Tiz the Law went nine furlongs, the time differentials are eye-catching.

Gamine: 22 2/5, 45 1/5, 1:09 2/5, 1:32 2/5.

Tiz the Law: 23, 46, 1:09 4/5, 1:34 2/5 and nine furlongs in 1:46 2/5.

True, not completely comparing apples to apples, but it gets your attention.

Gamine followed that up in the Test Stakes, one of the top sprints for females in the nation contested at seven furlongs. She faced a great deal of pressure in the first half-mile, but she casually went about her business with strong split times and coasted home easily by seven lengths in 1:20 4/5. Once again, Velazquez kept her away from the rail while leading the entire trip.

Swiss Skydiver has run a great deal and experience is on her side. She has also been around two turns on five occasions, which is more two-turn races than Gamine has run collectively. As far as qualifying Oaks points, Swiss Skydiver has accumulated about three times the points as the second place filly, Speech, who was soundly defeated by Swiss Skydiver in the Santa Anita Oaks. The filly that is third in the points standing is Bonny South, who managed a decent second in the all-important Alabama Stakes at 1 ¼ miles August 15. Please remember that the only reason one can call the Alabama runner up’s effort decent is because the winner was being geared down with a hard hold the last furlong.

In my mind, the win by Swiss Skydiver in the Fantasy Stakes at Oaklawn on May 1 portrays her the best. In a field of 14 fillies, she showed she has excellent tactical early speed, and we all know that is one of the best ways to avoid trouble in a race. Swiss Skydiver, dismissed in the wagering at about 15-1, stayed along the rail chasing the big favorite, Venetian Harbor, and gradually advanced before challenging the favorite for the majority of the stretch. But when it came time to determine the better filly, Swiss Skydiver slapped her opponent and won like a champ. It is important to note that Gamine toyed with Venetian Harbor in the Grade One Test before winning with ease.

My imagination tells me that Gamine will lead early, and Swiss Skydiver will track her. Assuming both have a clear trip, I imagine the battle in the stretch on Oaks Day will be one to remember. Both Gamine and Swiss Skydiver are great fillies. I, for one, look forward to seeing this heavyweight bout. After all the analysis and after watching tapes of races, only one question remains for the Kentucky Oaks.

Who will run third?

Born into slavery, He won the Kentucky Derby three times and became the richest American athlete

Born into slavery in Clark County, Kentucky, in 1861, he moved to Lexington with his mother after the end of the Civil War. In 1874, his mother, perhaps due to ill health or the loss of her savings in a bank crash, apprenticed the teenager to James T. Williams, a horse breeder. He learned to care for and exercise the horses. Eli Jordan, a friend of his mother’s, took a special interest in the boy and taught him the intricacies of pace and horse racing. Since he was small, he was an ideal jockey.  Who is he?

Source: Born into slavery, this man won the Kentucky Derby three times and became the richest American athlete

DID YOU MISS?

Are the Kentucky Derby Points a good selection tool?

Are Kentucky Derby and Oaks Points a Useful Selection Tool?

by Art Parker

In 2013 the criteria for being able to enter the Kentucky Derby was measured by graded stakes earnings accumulated during the career of a three year old. The idea was to award those that performed well in certain races known as “Derby Preps.” These races are the traditional big races in the spring when racing eyes are beginning to envision the first Saturday in May.

While this year has been quite a bit different due to the Coronavirus pandemic, the Kentucky Derby points system is still the measurement used to determine who gets into the gate on September 5, the Derby Day of 2020. The actual races may have changed a bit but the point system is still the determinant.

On the Derby Leaderboard the clear favorite for the race, Tiz the Law, has 372 points after embarrassing competition in several outings this year, most notably the Travers, which was his last start.

Churchill Downs Stock UpgradedThe second horse behind the leader is Authentic, one of two Bob Baffert charges. Authentic has 200 points which puts him slightly above half of what the Tiz the Law has accumulated. Comparing the point differential from first to second in prior years tells us that Tiz the Law is in a league of his own – at least based on points. This has been the difference in other years: zero, one, 13, 16, 18, 21, and 30. The number that looks so big, 30, was Derby winner’s California Chrome’s number over Vicar’s in Trouble in 2014. By the way, only one other point’s leader that has won the Derby was in 2013, when Orb romped home on a muddy track.

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Since California Chrome no point’s leader has won the Derby. The winner in 2019, Country House, was 17th in points in a Derby we all wish to forget, except the winner’s connections. In 2018 Triple Crown winner Justify was ninth sporting only his Santa Anita Derby win. In 2017 Always Dreaming was seventh in points. In 2016 Derby winner Nyquist was second in points to eventual great Gun Runner. When American Pharoah won the Triple Crown in 2015 he was fourth on the points list.

Should you select a Derby winner based upon on points? According to this, the answer is no, based on history. However, no other horse has held such a colossal amount of points over the competition.

The points leaderboard for the Kentucky Oaks looks similar. Swiss Skydiver has been on tour winning four major races in four different states. Her point total for the Kentucky Oaks is a whopping 450. In second is Speech with only 160 points. The difference of 290 points is hard to imagine. Like the Derby, let’s look at the point differential between the leader and second place. The only Oaks winner that led in points was Untapable in 2014. The point differential between first and second on the leaderboard has been, zero, zero, 6, 10, 19, 20, and Untapable’s 40.

In 2019 Serengeti Empress won the Oaks and was eighth on the points list. In 2018 Oaks winner Monomy Girl was second on the points list to Midnight Bisou. Abel Tasman won the Oaks in 2017 and was seventh on the points list. In 2016 Cathryn Sophia captured the Oaks while finishing sixth in the points race. Lovely Maria won the 2015 Oaks and was fifth in points. Before Untapable in 2013 Princess of Sylmar finished seventh on the points list and won the Oaks.

Like the points question asked earlier about the Derby, should you select an Oaks winner based upon on points? According to this, the answer is no, based on history. However, just like the point differential in the Derby, no other horse has held such a colossal amount of points over the competition in the Oaks.

A major consideration in the Oaks points this year is Bob Baffert’s filly, Gamine. The superstar is ninth on the points list but has raced in only one race with points – The Acorn at Belmont.

For a final, up to date listing of points for the Derby and the Oaks.

Industry Profile: Racehorse Owner Jack Knowlton

From Fairy Tale to Triumph

In 1995 Jack and five pals of his formed Sackatoga Stable. The name was a play on words. A combination of letters from the crew’s hometown of Sackets Harbor along with Jack’s residency in Saratoga Springs creating an amusing name for the enterprise. They chose the staid checkered colors of maroon and gray that matched those of their high school for the stable’s jockey silks.

They liked the name so much that they named their first horse Sackets Six. Little did they know that eight years later lightning would strike them in the form of a three-year-old gelding with the name Funny Cide…

Meet the Owners of the Kentucky Derby Contenders

You’ve probably heard of some of the horses running in this year’s Kentucky Derby , but how much do you know about their owners? Here’s your chance to meet the people …

12. Enforceable

About: John Oxley founded Oxley Petroleum, an oil and gas exploration firm based in his native Tulsa, Okla. in 1962. He sold the company in May of 2003 and has since started Oxley Resources LLC, a smaller scale oil and gas exploration and production venture.

6. Max Player

Owner: George E. Hall

About: A graduate of the United States Merchant Marine Academy, George Hall is president of the Clinton Group, Inc., a Manhattan-based investment company which manages over $6 billion in capital. He was awarded the Sir Harold Acton Medal from New York University in recognition of his philanthropy, and he established the George E. Hall Childhood Diabetes Foundation at Mount Sinai Hospital after his eldest niece’s diagnosis when she was just 6 years old. Additionally, Hall has helped establish the Head and Neck Cancer Research Laboratory at NYU as well as the endowment of a chair for its Department of Otolaryngology.

Nilsen's analysis

Breaking News! No Fans at This Year’s Kentucky Derby

Empty row of seats at racetrackLOUISVILLE, KY., (August 21, 2020) – Churchill Downs Incorporated (“CDI”) (Nasdaq: CHDN)
announced today its decision to run the 146th Kentucky Derby on September 5, 2020 without fans. CDI issued the following statement:

The Kentucky Derby is a time-honored American tradition which has always been about bringing people together. However, the health and safety of our team, fans and participants is our highest concern.
Churchill Downs has worked diligently over the last several months to plan a safe Derby with a limited number of spectators in attendance. We were confident in that plan, but dedicated to remaining flexible using the best and most reliable information available. With the current significant increases in COVID19
cases in Louisville as well as across the region, we needed to again revisit our planning. We have
made the difficult decision to hold this year’s Kentucky Derby on September 5 without fans.

Churchill Downs and all of our team members feel strongly that it is our collective responsibility as citizens of
Louisville to do all we responsibly can to protect the health, safety and security of our community in these
challenging times and believe that running the Derby without spectators is the best way to do that. We
deeply regret the disappointment this will bring to our loyal fans.

The decision comes with the support of Governor Andy Beshear who said, “The virus is still aggressively
spreading in Kentucky, and the White House has announced that Jefferson County and the City of
Louisville are in a ‘red zone’ based on increases in cases. This week alone the county had more than
2,300 new cases,” Gov. Beshear said. “I applaud Churchill Downs for continuing to monitor the virus and
for making the right and responsible decision. I am asking all Kentuckians to take action to stop the
spread of the virus so we can get back to the many traditions we enjoy, like the Kentucky Derby.”
Since early May, decisions regarding this year’s Kentucky Derby have been made in consultation with
public health authorities including data provided by medical experts at Norton Healthcare. Positivity rates
in the more than 70,000 patients tested at Norton have gone from as low as 2% in June to a rapid
escalation of 10% in recent days.

“This is a critical point in time for our community,” said Russell F. Cox, president and CEO of Norton
Healthcare. “This remains a very fluid situation and every event should be evaluated based on the data
available as close to the date of the event as possible. We appreciate and support Churchill Downs’
decision.”

“This year’s Kentucky Derby was never going to be the celebration we’re used to, but I could not be more
grateful to our tremendous team members and community partners for all of their efforts. We’ve left no
stones unturned and reached the right decision,” said Bill Carstanjen, CEO of CDI. “We hope our fans,
the Louisville community and our country find an opportunity over the coming weeks to reflect on the
challenges we have faced this year as a community and as a nation, and work together toward a better and
safer future.”

Additional information about Kentucky Derby 146:
 The decision to run without fans includes Kentucky Oaks on Friday, September 4 and all live
racing at Churchill Downs Racetrack for Derby week (September 1-5). Only essential personnel
and participants will be permitted on property.

 Ticket holders for all Derby week race dates and related programming, including Dawn at the
Downs, will be automatically issued a refund.

 NBC will televise coverage of the Kentucky Derby and undercard racing on September 5 from
2:30-7:30 p.m. ET. The 146th running of the Kentucky Oaks will be televised Friday, September 4
on NBCSN from 3-6 p.m. ET.

About Churchill Downs Incorporated
Churchill Downs Incorporated is an industry-leading racing, online wagering and gaming entertainment
company anchored by our iconic flagship event – The Kentucky Derby. We own and operate Derby City
Gaming, a historical racing machine facility in Louisville, Kentucky. We also own and operate the largest
online horse racing wagering platform in the U.S., TwinSpires.com, and we operate sports betting and
iGaming through our BetAmerica platform in multiple states. We are also a leader in brick-and-mortar
casino gaming with approximately 11,000 slot machines and video lottery terminals and 200 table games
in eight states. Additional information about CDI can be found online at
www.churchilldownsincorporated.com.