Incredible. No Thanksgiving Card at Del Mar due to Forecast

We are in unprecedented times, as Del Mar will not hold Thanksgiving Day racing due to the weather forecast.

Source: DMR

With inclement weather predicted to bring substantial rain on Wednesday and Thursday of the coming week, Del Mar Thoroughbred Club proactively cancelled its scheduled Thanksgiving Day race card as part of its continuing emphasis on horse and rider safety.

Track officials plan to shift several of the races from Thursday’s program – including the $100,000, Grade III Red Carpet Stakes – to expanded race cards on Saturday, November 30 and Sunday, December 1.

Additionally, the track is intending to run its Friday program as scheduled, but offering races only on its main track that day. Friday’s scheduled feature race, the $200,000, Grade II Hollywood Turf Cup, will be run on Sunday.

“The Weatherman is making it tough, but safety always comes first,” said Del Mar’s executive vice president for racing Tom Robbins. “We are appreciative of the cooperation from our horsemen. We’re planning on putting on a good show Friday and following that with tremendous stakes-filled cards on both Saturday and Sunday. We’ve got horses and horsemen coming into town from back east for our big races and we want them to know that their races will be presented as planned under safe and proper conditions.”

Del Mar worked with industry stakeholders – notably the Thoroughbred Owners of California – and its regulator, the California Horse Racing Board, in reshaping the conclusion of its fall racing season.

In the revised weekend slate, the track will move up first post both Saturday and Sunday to 12 noon and run 10 races on each day. Grass racing will be emphasized and there will be seven graded turf races conducted over the two days offering $1.3 million in purses.

The two-day turf stakes bonanza will consist of the Red Carpet for fillies and mares at 11 furlongs; the Hollywood Turf Cup for 3-year-olds and up at 12 furlongs; the $100,000, Grade III Jimmy Durante for 2-year-old fillies at a mile; the $200,000, Grade II Seabiscuit Handicap for 3-year-olds an up at a mile and one-sixteenth; the $300,000, Grade I Hollywood Derby at nine furlongs; the $100,000, Grade III Cecil B. DeMille Stakes for 2-year-olds at a mile, and the $300,000, Grade I Matriarch Stakes for fillies and mares, aged 3 and up, at a mile.

Though Del Mar’s planned Thanksgiving race card will not happen, the facility will be open for Thanksgiving Brunch – featuring turkey and all the trimmings – from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. In addition, simulcast wagering will be presented along with traditional NFL action. Wagering will be held in its usual spot in the Mission Tower building starting at 9 a.m. and going forward to approximately 2:30 p.m., with races at Golden Gate Fields along with tracks from across the country on the agenda.

Weather may determine Santa Anita racing days for upcoming winter meet

Santa Anita apron

copyright AGameofSkill.com

Santa Anita Park racetrack has received a green light from the state to begin its winter-spring meet Dec. 26 under the condition that the track be shut down in the event of inclement weather.

The California Horse Racing Board conditionally approved the venue’s license Thursday without answers to key questions, such as what exactly constitutes “inclement weather” and who will make the call.

Those answers will be presented by The Stronach Group, Santa Anita’s owners, at the CHRB’s next meeting on Dec. 12 at Los Alamitos racetrack. At that time, if the board members aren’t happy with the process, they’ll be able to retract their approval.

“If these procedures and protocols are put into place and enforced, the governor has no reason not to allow racing to continue,” said Gregory Ferraro, new chairman of the CHRB .

Ferraro, a former racetrack veterinarian who was appointed to the board by Gov. Gavin Newsom earlier this year, pledged the state board would be pursuing stricter regulations than it has in the past.

“The days of permissive medication are over,” he said. “We will gradually eliminate medications and keep them away from racing dates and training. We expect opposition, but we’re determined to carry this out in the best interest of horses and jockeys.”

Since last December, 37 horses have died while racing or training at Santa Anita. Initially, those deaths were believed to have …

Wet Racetracks in California May Be in the History Books

Source: Del Mar Thoroughbred Club

Due to projections of rain from Tuesday through Thursday of next week in San Diego, Del Mar Thoroughbred Club (DMTC) announced today that its Thursday, November 21 race card has been cancelled.  This action was due to “an abundance of caution,” said DMTC officials as the inclement weather likely will result in a muddy main track and soft turf course.  Entries for next Thursday’s card were scheduled to be taken tomorrow (Saturday) morning.

3 horses injured, 2 euthanized during race at California trackDMTC consulted with industry stakeholders, including the Thoroughbred Owners of California and its regulator, the California Horse Racing Board, about the cancellation and all parties agreed that the move provided for the safest possible racing environment.

“We know this is unusual for Del Mar,” said DMTC’s executive vice president for racing Tom Robbins, “but equine and rider safety is always our primary concern. We’ll make a call next week as to whether or not we’ll have training on Wednesday and Thursday.  We plan on drawing entries for next Friday’s card (November 22) this Sunday and we’ll race, weather permitting.”

Racing will be conducted as planned this Friday, Saturday and Sunday with first post at 12:30 p.m. on all days.

This Stallion with 4 Runners Tops the Breeders’ Cup Sires

BC Sires 2019 via BH

Source: Blood-Horse

Claiborne Farm’s leading sire War Front , WinStar Farm’s Speightstown , and Spendthrift Farm’s marquee sire Into Mischief  lead the Breeders’ Cup World Championships sire roster as of Oct. 29 with five entrants apiece.

They are among six stallions that could be represented by at least four starters during the two-day event at Santa Anita Park Nov. 1-2.

Get the full recap from the Blood-Horse Magazine and the top Breeders’ Cup Sires.

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Decorated Invader & The West Point Grads in the Breeders’ Cup

Source:  Military Times

On Friday, Nov. 1, Finley’s team will have the opportunity to demonstrate that teamwork when one of their thoroughbreds, a 2-year-old named Decorated Invader, competes against horses from all over the world in the Breeders’ Cup.

After graduating from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1986 and serving in the Army for four years, Finley reconnected with his childhood passion and launched West Point Thoroughbreds in 1991.

“I think after you’ve had the honor of the experience at the Academy, you take away the fact that everything’s got to work together,” Finley, who grew up going to the racetracks, told Military Times. “There can’t be a weak link, and if you do have a weak link, you have to address that.”

Just like a military unit, the same rings true in the horse racing business where grooms function as the sergeants, partners as the generals, and trainers and jockeys as commander on the field, Finley said.

“Really, every part has got to be strong, every part’s got to be growing in the same direction,” Finley said.

In a cross-sectional twist of fate, Finley’s circle also includes another West Point graduate: Bill Sandbrook, who served in the Army for 13 years after graduating from West Point in 1979, and now is the chairman and CEO of US Concrete.

Together, they are owners of a thoroughbred racing horse with a military-inspired name: Decorated Invader.

Decorated Invader, whose father was named Declaration of War, has the opportunity to do just that when he competes in one of the world’s biggest horse racing contests, the Breeders’ Cup in Santa Anita, California.

After months of training, Decorated Invader made his racing debut on July 13, 2019 in Saratoga, New York, placing second. Weeks later, he secured his first victory in his next race on August 10 also in Saratoga, followed by another victory on Sept. 15 in Toronto, Ontario in Canada.

That last win paved the way for him to compete in the Breeders’ Cup, an international contest that involves 14 championship races and includes awards totaling more than $30 million. Decorated Invader is slated to participate in the Juvenile Turf race on Nov. 1.

According to TVG, the official betting partner of the 2019 Breeders’ Cup, Decorated Invader’s odds are 7:1 as of Oct. 21, meaning one would make a $7 profit off of every dollar one wagers. Additionally, the implied probability to win is 12.5 percent, per TVG’s calculations.

“Our confidence level is absolutely sky high,” Finley said. “Probably as high as it’s ever been with a horse that we’ve run in the Breeders’ Cup.”

On Saturday Decorated Invader is also set to go up against his half-brother Peace Achieved, whose father is also Declaration of War. Peace Achieved’s odds are 11:1, according to TVG. The implied probability to win translates to 8.3 percent.

“You can also have lots and lots of statistics that you can put into various degrees of sophisticated analysis to try to predict the winner,” Sandbrook said.

Although Sandbrook has long admired horses, it was only recently that he got involved in a partnership with Finley as a partial owner. The two met in 2015 during a Thayer Leader Development Group at West Point conference held at Nasdaq.

But in 2018, Sandbrook started to get involved in a partnership with West Point Thoroughbreds and has since been a majority owner of several horses, including Decorated Invader, who was purchased as a colt in Sept. 2018 for $200,000.

“”There are some really, really big races especially next summer that we would put a big circle around,” Finley said. “But it goes without saying our focus is on that next Friday.”

Finley said racing horses like he does in the U.S. is a testament to the American dream as he noted these large races attract competitors from all over the world, including horses owned by royalty in the Middle East. But the U.S. is different because it doesn’t matter who your parents are and politics are irrelevant when it comes to racing horses, Finley said.

Trainer Charlie Appleby has Old Persian as a Major Player in Breeders’ Cup Turf

The Breeders’ Cup meeting at Santa Anita lost three of its European team members on Monday – including —Magical, the Champion Stakes winner – but there is still likely to be a total of 33 runners from the continent’s stables in California on Friday and Saturday …

Charlie Appleby’s challenge at the meeting was reduced from two to one in desperate circumstances on Saturday when Line Of Duty, who took the Juvenile Turf last year and was due to contest the Mile on Saturday, suffered a fatal injury on the gallops. Appleby will now rely on Old Persian, a leading contender for the Turf, as he attempts to improve an already remarkable strike rate at the Breeders’ Cup, where he has had three winners and a second from six starters.

“It was six years ago that we were here with Outstrip, bless him,” Appleby said on Tuesday, looking back to his first Breeders’ Cup runner, and winner, in the 2013 Juvenile Turf. “It’s great to be here but it’s not a holiday, as much as it’s lovely to have the [mountainous] backdrop we see out there. We try to bring the right horses out, with the experience we’ve had through the years.

“I was always looking [for a juvenile to run] but didn’t want to put one on the wagon just to have a spin around. The great thing about a horse like him [Old Persian] is that shipping is second nature to him. He went to Dubai, he went to Canada [to win the Grade One Northern Dancer Stakes at Woodbine last time] and he’s shipped well here.

“This race was our target from Dubai [in March, where he won the Group One Sheema Classic]. I was confident he’d take all the beating [in Canada], he was the class horse in the race and he showed it. We wanted to keep the dream alive and we were always going to come straight here.

More at The Guardian:

$60 million thoroughbred horse track near New Hampshire state line?

Source:  Press Release

ROWLEY, Mass. (AP) — Three proposals are jockeying to return thoroughbred horse racing to Massachusetts.

The Massachusetts Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association says it’s working with an investment group to build a $60 million track on 280-acres in Rowley, near the New Hampshire state line.

John Grossi, who founded the Latitude Sports Club chain, is leading the Rowley Group’s proposal. The group is expected to pitch its plan to town officials later this month.

It’s the third proposal to emerge since Suffolk Downs hosted its last live races in June.

Sterling Suffolk Racecourse, which operated the historic Boston track, wants to refurbish the Great Barrington Fairgrounds in the Berkshires.

And the Notos Group, which is headed by developer Tom O’Connell, proposes a horse track, hotel and entertainment complex in Wareham.

The proposals all require legislative approval.

Aidan O’Brien’s Runners Aiming for Breeders’ Cup at Santa Anita

Aidan O'Brien's Arizona pointed at Santa Anita for Breeders' CupThe duo [of Arizona and Wichita] were beaten two lengths and two and three-quarter lengths respectively in the Group One heat, with Arizona notably closing the gap with the winner after trailing him by nine lengths in the National Stakes at the Curragh previously.

Trainer Aidan O’Brien was satisfied with their performances and could now look to Santa Anita on November 1 and 2 with the pair.

O’Brien said: “Arizona ran well, as we were worried about the ground for him. He’s a nice-moving horse.

“Arizona and Wichita are both possibles for the Breeders’ Cup, although Wichita might be a little bit more of a baby as he wasn’t out until later.”

The Ballydoyle handler also has Royal Lodge winner Royal Dornoch and Listed victor Fort Myers among his possible Santa Anita team.

He added: “Royal Dornoch is another possible for the Juvenile and Fort Myers who won in Dundalk is another that could go. We’ll see how they are in the next few weeks.”

QnA on Horse Racing, Omaha Beach, Santa Anita Drag and more

Q: So help me sort this out. Omaha Beach is gone for six months, returns and wins a sprint race, and now suddenly he’s back in the Breeders’ Cup picture again? I heard he was not under consideration for the Classic anymore, and now he is? I’m confused.

A: After his impressive victory in last weekend’s Santa Anita Sprint Championship, one in which he ran the 6 furlongs in an insane 1:08.79 over a track that has been playing extremely slow, trainer Richard Mandella said “anything is possible,” that the 3-year-old colt could run in the Breeders’ Cup Sprint, Dirt Mile or Classic. Word is the horse’s camp is leaning toward the Sprint because Mandella hasn’t had enough time to gear him up to run the Classic’s 1 1/4-mile distance. If he had time for one more prep race, I think they’d go in the Classic, but he doesn’t. Whatever decision Mandella makes, it will be the right one. He knows a heck of a lot more about horses than I do.

QnA on Horse Racing:

$14M Everest this Friday Night ‘Down Under’

Source: Sky Racing World

The TAB Everest is the newest horse race in Australia and also the richest turf race in the world with a total of $14 million (AUD) in prize money. The 3rd running of The Everest will take place on Friday night, October 18 (US date/time), at Royal Randwick racecourse.

A weight-for-age sprint contested over 6 furlongs, The Everest is now the crown jewel of the Sydney Spring Racing Carnival and the $14 million prize pool sees it surpass the iconic Melbourne Cup ($6.2 million) as the richest Australian horse race.

Get the latest in 2019 Breeders’ Cup News here

The Everest is unlike any other race contested down under and entry into The Everest field comes at a cost of $600,000 to connections. The concept is similar to the Pegasus World Cup as horse owners buy a slot and The Everest field has a capacity of 12 starters.