Nilsen’s Preakness Full-Card Analysis

Rich Nilsen handicapperFull-card Selections for Saturday’s Preakness card (May 18, 2019)

Expert Selections for every race, all 14 included.

Several price plays selected including three longshot selections on top!

Recommended Win wager and exotic wagering plays for the Preakness.  Nilsen has a big bomber in the Preakness, a horse that is being totally overlooked!

Expert Pace Analysis for all 14 races.

Get Rich Nilsen’s analysis of the 2019 FULL-CARD Preakness Stakes.   This has always been one of his favorite days of the year to play.

Only $9.97 for the full card.

 
Nilsen, an 8-time major tournament winner and 15-time NHC Qualifier, used to work in Maryland under the tutelage of Hall of Fame trainer King Leatherbury.  He knows this circuit well.

Preakness Day Full-card Analysis includes:

Top selection, Contenders, Pace Analysis and recommended wagers for the big race.

All 14 races covered!

Fixed Odds. Free Data. Horse Racing Industry weighs changes to compete with sports gambling

The sport has a long tradition of pari-mutuel wagering where the odds fluctuate and nothing is set until the horses leave the starting gate. But with the legalization of sports gambling in the United States and its gradually expanding implementation around the country, adding fixed-odds wagering could be a way for the horse racing to adapt and compete in the changing landscape.

“When we had a monopoly, we certainly benefited from that, but it made us very lazy and it’s time to get moving,” said Craig Bernick of the Thoroughbred Idea Foundation that recently raised the possibility of adding fixed-odds betting in horse racing. “If we don’t adjust, I personally think sports betting has a very good chance to destroy most of the horse racing gambling because the price, the familiarity that everyday people have with those sports that they grew up with, the free access to data and the type of bets allowed all favor sports betting over horse racing. We really need to innovate.”

Rich Nilsen’s article about FREE horse racing data

This isn’t the first time horse racing has needed to fend off challenges to its longstanding betting monopoly. There was the addition of lotteries across the United States, then came the proliferation of casino gambling that in some states partially funded horse racing and gave a boost to a fading business model.

The impact of legalized sports betting seems to be heading in the opposite direction.

Even though places like New Jersey’s Monmouth Park have championed the cause and embraced it, it’s not expected to be a financial windfall for horse racing.

R.I.P. Tim Conway, aka Jockey Lyle Dorf

The one-and-only Tim Conway passed away today at the age of 85.  He was best known for his role in the Carol Burnett television show, but for those of us in the horse racing industry, he was also jockey Lyle Dorf.  Here is his skit with Johnny Carson.

Here is a 1988 interview with track announcer Trevor Denman of Santa Anita.  Denman sits down for a conversation with comedian Tim Conway, a big fan of horse racing.  Conway gives a great tip for new fans at the 1:40 mark of the video.   Denman also provides some great insight that is the worth the listen for every horseplayer.

 

Preakness: Win Win Win Possible for Middle Jewel

Schmuck: Why moving Preakness from Pimlico to Laurel Park might actually be a bad ideaMaybe Maybe Maybe. Live Oak Plantation’s Win Win Win is a possible candidate for the 144th Preakness Stakes (G1) May 18 at Pimlico Race Course , trainer Michael Trombetta said May 8. Win Win Win ended up ninth in the Kentucky Derby Presented by Woodford Reserve (G1) May 4 […]

“I have the luxury of being close to home for a change,” he said. “I just want to see the horse train for a couple of days and figure there is no reason to make that decision before I see that. It’s only fair to the horse at this point.

So far, Trombetta likes how the son of Hat Trick looks at Fair Hill.

“Today was his first day back on the track for a light jog. It was fine. Everything seems fine,” he said. “I just want to observe and make sure that I am completely happy before I go in that direction and make that commitment. It was a hard trip and it was a bit of tough circumstances with the race.”

Arlington International Racecourse America’s Most Beautiful Horse Racing Track

Arlington International Racecourse America’s Most Beautiful Horse Racing Track

Chicago Daily Herald Full coverage: Arlington International Racecourse America’s Most Beautiful Horse Racing Track

What is a Horse Racing Steward?

Horse race stewards have important ties to Louisville, which is a world destination for those willing to take their place in the hot seat.

“People don’t know them, because if nothing ever goes wrong you don’t even know they exist…which is how it should be,” Terri Burch, the UofL Equine Industry Program Coordinator, said.

Burch is also one of the designers of the accreditation program, called ROAP, for race stewards. ROAP stands for Racing Officials Accreditation Program. It is the overseeing agency.

The three people sitting in that room at Churchill Downs that decided Maximum Security was disqualified went through ROAP.

So, who would want to be a steward?  Read on…

Horse Racing Meet starts May 13 at Presque Isle Downs & Casino

Monday-Thursday racing opens 100-date season; Sundays added July 7-Aug. 25

Presque Isle Downs & Casino has again adjusted its schedule for the 12th full season of thoroughbred racing, which opens on Monday, May 13.

Eight-race programs will be Monday through Thursday for the first eight weeks and the final seven weeks of a 23-week, 100-date season that ends Thursday, Oct. 17, the latest date the track has closed.

Sunday racing, popular in summer with local fans but the lowest day in the lucrative off-track on-line handle totals, begins July 7 and continues eight weeks until Sunday, Aug. 25. On Labor Day, Sept. 2, racing returns to four days a week for the final seven weeks.

Presque Isle Downs had run five-days-a-week racing since its first full season in 2008, but in 2018 raced Monday through Thursday the first five weeks in an effort to increase fields early in the season until more horses arrive at the track and round into form.

“We increased the four-day schedule to keep up with the populace of the barns and horses can race less frequently while we bolster the size of the racing fields which makes for stronger betting races,” said Matt Ennis, director of racing and finance director for Presque Isle Downs LLC, now owned by Churchill Downs.

In 2018, Presque Isle Downs set records for off-track handle ($78,127,458) and total handle ($83,042,838), an increase of more than $11.2 million over 2017…

Kentucky Horse Tracks Paid For Their Own Video Gambling Regulations

When gamblers bet at the chirping, neon-glowing machines that stretch across Kentucky’s gambling parlors, they depend on a state commission to ensure they’re winning — or losing — fair and square.

The commission that oversees gambling depends on a consulting firm for advice about ensuring these systems, known as “historical horse racing” terminals, run legally and accurately. But when it comes to testing machines, records show the state’s regulatory commission let the tracks themselves fund and oversee the consultant’s work.

From 2012 to 2017, a consultant hired by the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission tested gaming machines at three gambling parlors associated with race tracks. But the horse racing commission was largely out of the loop from there: Keeneland, Ellis Park, Kentucky Downs and two machine manufacturers paid more than $845,000 for testing services with virtually no direct oversight from the horse racing commission, according to a review by the office of the Auditor of Public Accounts.

The commission didn’t even have copies of the invoices from New Jersey-based Gaming Laboratories International until it gathered them for the auditor.

The horse racing commission also asked the tracks to pay about $26,000 for the cost of the consultant’s work drafting new regulatory restrictions. The auditor’s office said he couldn’t find any law that allowed that arrangement…

Longtime Tournament Vet Rick Broth Wins 2019 KDBC

Broth Scores $147k Win with DQ

Frustrated after he didn’t win a single one of his Kentucky Derby bets, Rick Broth left Churchill Downs in a hurry on Saturday evening.

The construction sales manager had just pulled onto I-65 South when a friend called to tell him that he might want to turn around.

For the first time in 145 runnings of the Kentucky Derby, the horse that crossed the finish line first did not actually win the race. Minutes after Broth left the track, racing stewards ruled that first-place Maximum Security impeded the run of a rival horse, resulting in his disqualification and in second-place Country House being declared the winner.

Here is a link to the official 2019 KDBC Leaderboard

For Broth, that stunning reversal was the difference between driving home to Atlanta with empty pockets and returning to the track to collect a life-altering payday. Not only did he win more than $47,000 wagering on Country House as a 65-1 long shot, he also won another $100,000 in prize money as the winner of the Kentucky Derby Betting Championship.

“I went from being the biggest loser that ever lived to a great story,” Broth said. “I couldn’t believe it. I was like, ‘Are you kidding me?’ I’ve been taken down 100 times at the track for big money, so to be put up is just unbelievable.”

Stories like Broth’s serve as a reminder how much money changed hands on Saturday night when the Kentucky Derby ended in controversy. Maximum Security’s disputed disqualification cost bettors who backed him millions of dollars in lost winnings…

Industry Profile: Professional gambler Mike Maloney

A Richmond native who lives in Lexington, the 63-year-old Maloney has been studying horse racing since age 15. But he turned pro, so to speak, about 20 years ago, becoming a full-time horseplayer and leaving his business as a wholesale antiques dealer.

It’s a journey he chronicled in the 2017 book “Betting With An Edge,” which was co-authored by Peter Thomas Fornatale. Maloney has wagered as much as $12 million in a year at one point, and he says he has turned a profit each year.

“I was in my 30s before I ever began to consistently show a profit at the track,” Maloney said. “Then once that began to happen, I thought, ‘There’s a possibility here.’ … I haven’t had a negative year, but there are a lot of years where I’m not happy and I want to do better. Then there are some years that were really good. But it’s not a smooth ride. You know, it’s gambling, and you have to embrace it that way.”

“There’s plenty of 12-hour workdays,” Maloney said. “It’s a 70 to 80-hour workweek.”

Some may instinctively recoil. Others might believe he’s got the best job in the world.

But neither response does justice to how rare it is that Maloney has had the makeup to thrive full time in a profession that a select few could do — or would want to — with numbers that seemingly dwindle each year as the game grows more difficult.

“These days, the people betting the most money, it’s AI, it’s computers, it’s algorithms, stuff like that,” Fornatale said. “But for an individual, you can’t really name (anyone better). Other people I know who’ve been doing it for a comparable amount of time as Mike are, I think, more consciously phasing out as the market gets more efficient and the game gets tougher. He’s still there grinding away, and it’s the only job he’s had in nearly 20 years.

“He really is at the pinnacle. As far as I’m concerned, put him on the Mount Rushmore of horseplayers.”   Read the rest…