Breeders’ Cup Board Approves a $4 Million increase in purses, safety measures

The Breeders' Cup horse racingLEXINGTON, Ky. (March, 2020) — The Breeders’ Cup Board of Directors met during a regularly scheduled meeting to discuss future business plans for the Company including next steps in advancing safety measures and purse levels for the two-day World Championships.

Safety Measures

The Breeders’ Cup Board continued its commitment to using the organization’s leadership position within the industry to encourage the adoption of increased safety requirements within and beyond the World Championships. Beginning at the 2020 World Championships, the Breeders’ Cup will adopt all six recommendations from Dr. Larry Bramlage’s report, (Pages 18-21). These process improvements are aimed at refining safety and veterinary evaluation protocols for future events. The report was the first of its kind as the Breeders’ Cup leads by example in promoting transparency and accountability in Thoroughbred racing.

In addition to its continued efforts to ensure that the World Championships are conducted under the highest standards of both safety and integrity, the Breeders’ Cup remains heavily involved in the Thoroughbred Safety Coalition’s advocacy for the implementation of the 19 safety and integrity reforms, to include those announced in November and December, at the state and/or track level. To this end, in order to host a Breeders’ Cup “Win and You’re In” Challenge race, U.S.-based tracks that are not members of the Thoroughbred Safety Coalition will be required to agree to adopt all 19 safety and integrity reforms that make up the Coalition platform and must demonstrate a good faith effort in implementing those reforms.

“The implementation of the increased safety measures outlined in the Bramlage report for our World Championships, along with the required adoption of the Thoroughbred Safety Coalition safety and integrity reforms by racetrack partners hosting Breeders’ Cup Challenge races, are the latest steps the Breeders’ Cup has taken to strengthen its longstanding commitment to instituting the highest standards in the overall conduct of our racing programs,” said Drew Fleming, Breeders’ Cup President and CEO.

Purse Levels

The Breeders’ Cup Board also approved a $4 million increase in purses, bringing total purses and awards for the two-day World Championships to $35 million. Purse payouts will also be modified to pay down to the 10th position from the current 8th position.

The purse increases begin with this year’s event at Keeneland Race Course in Lexington, Ky. on November 6 – 7 and will be allocated as follows:

  • $1 million to the Longines Breeders’ Cup Classic for a total purse of $7 million
  • $2 million to the Longines Breeders’ Cup Turf for a total purse of $6 million
  • $1 million to the Big Ass Fans Breeders’ Cup Dirt Mile for a total purse of $2 million

These increases put the Longines Breeders’ Cup Turf tied for the richest Group 1 turf race in the world and solidify the Big Ass Fans Breeders’ Cup Dirt Mile as the richest dirt mile race worldwide.  The Longines Breeders’ Cup Classic remains the richest race in North America and the third richest Group 1 in the world.

“These purse increases reflect the Breeders’ Cup’s mission to conduct the World Championships at the highest levels of quality and to keep our races competitive on the international stage,” said Fleming. “Our decision to increase purse payouts to 10th place in all our races is a tribute to the loyal participation of our owners and trainers who support the World Championships each year.”

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ABOUT BREEDERS’ CUP
The Breeders’ Cup administers the Breeders’ Cup World Championships, Thoroughbred horse racing’s year-end Championships, as well as the Breeders’ Cup Challenge qualifying series, which provides automatic starting positions into the Championships races. The Breeders’ Cup is also a founding member of the Thoroughbred Safety Coalition, an organization composed of industry leaders committed to advancing safety measures in Thoroughbred racing and improving the well-being of equine and human athletes.

The 2020 Breeders’ Cup World Championships, consisting of 14 Championship races, will be held on November 6-7 at Keeneland Race Course in Lexington, Kentucky and features a total of $35 million in purses and awards. The event will be televised live by the NBC Sports Group. Breeders’ Cup press releases appear on the Breeders’ Cup website, breederscup.com. You can also follow the Breeders’ Cup on social media platforms FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

This Stallion with 4 Runners Tops the Breeders’ Cup Sires

BC Sires 2019 via BH

Source: Blood-Horse

Claiborne Farm’s leading sire War Front , WinStar Farm’s Speightstown , and Spendthrift Farm’s marquee sire Into Mischief  lead the Breeders’ Cup World Championships sire roster as of Oct. 29 with five entrants apiece.

They are among six stallions that could be represented by at least four starters during the two-day event at Santa Anita Park Nov. 1-2.

Get the full recap from the Blood-Horse Magazine and the top Breeders’ Cup Sires.

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Decorated Invader & The West Point Grads in the Breeders’ Cup

Source:  Military Times

On Friday, Nov. 1, Finley’s team will have the opportunity to demonstrate that teamwork when one of their thoroughbreds, a 2-year-old named Decorated Invader, competes against horses from all over the world in the Breeders’ Cup.

After graduating from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1986 and serving in the Army for four years, Finley reconnected with his childhood passion and launched West Point Thoroughbreds in 1991.

“I think after you’ve had the honor of the experience at the Academy, you take away the fact that everything’s got to work together,” Finley, who grew up going to the racetracks, told Military Times. “There can’t be a weak link, and if you do have a weak link, you have to address that.”

Just like a military unit, the same rings true in the horse racing business where grooms function as the sergeants, partners as the generals, and trainers and jockeys as commander on the field, Finley said.

“Really, every part has got to be strong, every part’s got to be growing in the same direction,” Finley said.

In a cross-sectional twist of fate, Finley’s circle also includes another West Point graduate: Bill Sandbrook, who served in the Army for 13 years after graduating from West Point in 1979, and now is the chairman and CEO of US Concrete.

Together, they are owners of a thoroughbred racing horse with a military-inspired name: Decorated Invader.

Decorated Invader, whose father was named Declaration of War, has the opportunity to do just that when he competes in one of the world’s biggest horse racing contests, the Breeders’ Cup in Santa Anita, California.

After months of training, Decorated Invader made his racing debut on July 13, 2019 in Saratoga, New York, placing second. Weeks later, he secured his first victory in his next race on August 10 also in Saratoga, followed by another victory on Sept. 15 in Toronto, Ontario in Canada.

That last win paved the way for him to compete in the Breeders’ Cup, an international contest that involves 14 championship races and includes awards totaling more than $30 million. Decorated Invader is slated to participate in the Juvenile Turf race on Nov. 1.

According to TVG, the official betting partner of the 2019 Breeders’ Cup, Decorated Invader’s odds are 7:1 as of Oct. 21, meaning one would make a $7 profit off of every dollar one wagers. Additionally, the implied probability to win is 12.5 percent, per TVG’s calculations.

“Our confidence level is absolutely sky high,” Finley said. “Probably as high as it’s ever been with a horse that we’ve run in the Breeders’ Cup.”

On Saturday Decorated Invader is also set to go up against his half-brother Peace Achieved, whose father is also Declaration of War. Peace Achieved’s odds are 11:1, according to TVG. The implied probability to win translates to 8.3 percent.

“You can also have lots and lots of statistics that you can put into various degrees of sophisticated analysis to try to predict the winner,” Sandbrook said.

Although Sandbrook has long admired horses, it was only recently that he got involved in a partnership with Finley as a partial owner. The two met in 2015 during a Thayer Leader Development Group at West Point conference held at Nasdaq.

But in 2018, Sandbrook started to get involved in a partnership with West Point Thoroughbreds and has since been a majority owner of several horses, including Decorated Invader, who was purchased as a colt in Sept. 2018 for $200,000.

“”There are some really, really big races especially next summer that we would put a big circle around,” Finley said. “But it goes without saying our focus is on that next Friday.”

Finley said racing horses like he does in the U.S. is a testament to the American dream as he noted these large races attract competitors from all over the world, including horses owned by royalty in the Middle East. But the U.S. is different because it doesn’t matter who your parents are and politics are irrelevant when it comes to racing horses, Finley said.

Trainer Charlie Appleby has Old Persian as a Major Player in Breeders’ Cup Turf

The Breeders’ Cup meeting at Santa Anita lost three of its European team members on Monday – including —Magical, the Champion Stakes winner – but there is still likely to be a total of 33 runners from the continent’s stables in California on Friday and Saturday …

Charlie Appleby’s challenge at the meeting was reduced from two to one in desperate circumstances on Saturday when Line Of Duty, who took the Juvenile Turf last year and was due to contest the Mile on Saturday, suffered a fatal injury on the gallops. Appleby will now rely on Old Persian, a leading contender for the Turf, as he attempts to improve an already remarkable strike rate at the Breeders’ Cup, where he has had three winners and a second from six starters.

“It was six years ago that we were here with Outstrip, bless him,” Appleby said on Tuesday, looking back to his first Breeders’ Cup runner, and winner, in the 2013 Juvenile Turf. “It’s great to be here but it’s not a holiday, as much as it’s lovely to have the [mountainous] backdrop we see out there. We try to bring the right horses out, with the experience we’ve had through the years.

“I was always looking [for a juvenile to run] but didn’t want to put one on the wagon just to have a spin around. The great thing about a horse like him [Old Persian] is that shipping is second nature to him. He went to Dubai, he went to Canada [to win the Grade One Northern Dancer Stakes at Woodbine last time] and he’s shipped well here.

“This race was our target from Dubai [in March, where he won the Group One Sheema Classic]. I was confident he’d take all the beating [in Canada], he was the class horse in the race and he showed it. We wanted to keep the dream alive and we were always going to come straight here.

More at The Guardian:

Breeders’ Cup Preparation – Part II

by Glen S.

Now that you have watched your replays and have some solid opinions on horses to either bet or bet against, it’s time to move on to the next step. Start looking at additional handicapping resources to get the extra info you may need.

Part II: More preparing for the Breeders Cup

Santa AnitaGood and bad information. Step one: understand the source you are getting this info from. Some information that is given out is simply an opinion. For example “Horse A should really take to the Santa Anita surface.” Why does this person think that – is it breeding, is it because he saw a race at another track with a similar surface or did the trainer mention to him that the training sessions have been good? I would only take that above statement if it was the last source.

At this point I wouldn’t listen to anyone’s selections. We know all the horses entered but what happens if one of them isn’t entered or scratched? Another speed horse doesn’t enter or gets scratched and now there is no pace to run it. Scenarios like this completely change the race shape.

What I would look at is how the horses got to where they are at now. Some runners needed to win the previous race to get in, while other runners would not be fully cranked. McKinzie, I am not sure if the horse was or was not fully cranked for his last race, but McKinzie didn’t need to win and get in.

There are many proven trends that show which horses do well at the Breeders Cup by going in certain races and which ones struggle. Get to know those trends. There is lots of information you can find about that. I follow the trends like this, a favorite should have strong trends (and few holes) before I would consider them. Longshot are longshots for a reason, there are always a few holes in them somewhere.  Find the positives you can grab on to.

Only one week to go, don’t get left behind in the research.

Do This Now for This Year’s Breeders’ Cup

The Breeders' Cup horse racingby Glen S.

The Breeders Cup is the best event in horse racing for the year round handicapper to hit the big one. The two days are in the advantage of the horse players that knows the game. However, if you are like all the other handicappers and do not prepare in advance, then there is simply no advantage for you come next weekend. So if you do not want to be like the others or the ones that just play the races a few times a year, keep reading.

How can I start to prepare so early, you ask? There are list of the main contenders throughout the various websites and many sites, including the Daily Racing Form (DRF) that have the expected entries. Print them off and start watching REPLAYS and more replays. The more you watch now, the less time you need later. Betptc.com has one of the best replay functions on the website, so why not take full advantage of it.

What to look for in a replay and what to take notes on:
-Was the horse compromised in the race, troubled trip, wide, no pace to run at, caught in a duel?

-Do not forget to make notes that might make the horse look better, lone speed, big pace to run at, perfect trip, etc.

When watching the horse racing replays, you do not need to know who the horse will be running against in the future.  It just gives you more information on the horse that many won’t take the time to see. Also if the horse is running against other horses in the upcoming race you will oftentimes see who is better based on the replay. Sometimes who beats who doesn’t tell the whole story, this is when you can hit that home run.

Monday Oct 21st is when the Breeders’ Cup pre-entries close and I would expect by Wednesday Oct 23rd you will be able to get a good idea of who is in. Now you can start figuring out the potential of each horse. I would avoid figuring out race shape but decide if the horse is a need-the-lead horse or a closer that needs pace to run at.

Monday Oct. 28th is when the post position draw is; I would expect by that evening you will be able to find what each race would look at. NOW start to figure out race shape.

Why prep now? The obvious reason, as mentioned, is get ahead of the competition and avoid so much work later. But even more importantly, avoid getting swayed but the media and all the hype. Let you be the judge first as to how talented you think the horse is and then listen to the others.

Part II preparing for the Breeders: Good info, bad info and how to use that to your advantage

Next post after the pre entries are up.

Aidan O’Brien’s Runners Aiming for Breeders’ Cup at Santa Anita

Aidan O'Brien's Arizona pointed at Santa Anita for Breeders' CupThe duo [of Arizona and Wichita] were beaten two lengths and two and three-quarter lengths respectively in the Group One heat, with Arizona notably closing the gap with the winner after trailing him by nine lengths in the National Stakes at the Curragh previously.

Trainer Aidan O’Brien was satisfied with their performances and could now look to Santa Anita on November 1 and 2 with the pair.

O’Brien said: “Arizona ran well, as we were worried about the ground for him. He’s a nice-moving horse.

“Arizona and Wichita are both possibles for the Breeders’ Cup, although Wichita might be a little bit more of a baby as he wasn’t out until later.”

The Ballydoyle handler also has Royal Lodge winner Royal Dornoch and Listed victor Fort Myers among his possible Santa Anita team.

He added: “Royal Dornoch is another possible for the Juvenile and Fort Myers who won in Dundalk is another that could go. We’ll see how they are in the next few weeks.”

QnA on Horse Racing, Omaha Beach, Santa Anita Drag and more

Q: So help me sort this out. Omaha Beach is gone for six months, returns and wins a sprint race, and now suddenly he’s back in the Breeders’ Cup picture again? I heard he was not under consideration for the Classic anymore, and now he is? I’m confused.

A: After his impressive victory in last weekend’s Santa Anita Sprint Championship, one in which he ran the 6 furlongs in an insane 1:08.79 over a track that has been playing extremely slow, trainer Richard Mandella said “anything is possible,” that the 3-year-old colt could run in the Breeders’ Cup Sprint, Dirt Mile or Classic. Word is the horse’s camp is leaning toward the Sprint because Mandella hasn’t had enough time to gear him up to run the Classic’s 1 1/4-mile distance. If he had time for one more prep race, I think they’d go in the Classic, but he doesn’t. Whatever decision Mandella makes, it will be the right one. He knows a heck of a lot more about horses than I do.

QnA on Horse Racing:

Breeders’ Cup Contender Omaha Beach Impressive in Return

You can’t say enough about Omaha Beach’s return to racing in the Grade 1 $300,000 Santa Anita Sprint Championship, a qualifier for the Breeders’ Cup Sprint. He stayed off the pace and then came firing on the inside to win by a head over heavy favorite Shancelot.

Mandella was in a good mood after winning Saturday’s race.

“I’m just very relieved to have him back,” Mandella said. “At the eighth pole, I thought we were [going to be] clear, but it took some race riding.…This horse has a heart of gold and he’s got the greatest personality of any horse I’ve ever had. I would say anything’s possible.”

Winning the race gave Omaha Beach a free pass into the Breeders’ Cup Sprint, which may not be the race he wants to run in.

“I want to enjoy this one, but the [Breeders’ Cup] Sprint, the Mile and the mile-and-a-quarter (Classic) are all possible,” Mandella said. “We’re gonna run in the Breeders’ Cup. For now, I’ll just drink that big bottle of champagne and think it over.”

More from John Cherwa at the LA Times:

Breeders’ Cup Turf the Target for Old Persian

…The four-year-old disappointed in the Coronation Cup at Epsom on his return to European action, and was then a beaten favorite in a Group One in Germany last month.

However, he was back in the winning groove when dominating the Northern Dancer Turf Stakes at Woodbine last Saturday – and Appleby feels his charge has earned himself a trip to Santa Anita in early November.

He said: “We were delighted with Old Persian, and he’s come back home in good order.

“The Breeders’ Cup is in our sights – that was the pencilled plan going into the Northern Dancer, and I think he deserves a crack at it now.

“A mile and a half on the turf at Santa Anita should suit him well.”

A few days after the Breeders’ Cup has been run, Appleby will chase a second successive victory in the Melbourne Cup, with last year’s winner Cross Counter set to be joined by stable companion Ispolini.

Read the rest about this Breeders’ Cup Turf contender: